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Ferno

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Ferno last won the day on July 14

Ferno had the most liked content!

About Ferno

  • Rank
    bread moon
  • Birthday 05/31/1991

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  • Interests
    Drawing, video games, music, animation, comics, and developing stories.
  • Gender
    Male
  • Country
    United States
  • Location
    in a cave with a box of scraps

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  1. I swear my Gamecube looks worse hooked up to my HD TV than it ever looked on my old CRT TV that I no longer have. I wonder if 3rd party composite/HDMI cables exist for it.

    1. Speederino

      Speederino

      It's not just you, old consoles look legitimately bad on HDTV's without a component or HDMI cable. Last I heard there was one guy selling his own HDMI cables online but I think they bricked the systems or something.

      This is the only reason my Wii is still on my TV stand. It Gamecubes better than my actual Gamecube does.

    2. Harkofthewaa

      Harkofthewaa

      The Gamecube does have component cables... but they're super rare and will run you about $200 (last time I checked, mind you). Now, if you have a Wii that's backwards compatible, you can get component cables for that for cheap. Either way though, in my opinion even with component my Wii/Gamecube looks far better on my CRT than on my HDTV (to be fair, I have a really good CRT). Using composite on an HDTV just looks like absolute garbage though.

    3. Polkadi~☆

      Polkadi~☆

      I need a component cable for my PS1 to look good, you all mean?

      DAMN IT! We don't use component cables in my country.

    4. Strickerx5

      Strickerx5

      That's what happens when you don't use the full resolution of the screen you're on sadly. See it all the time when I play my PS4 on the 1440p monitor. You're stretching the image and making things blurrier as a result. Though yeah, component cables do help quite a bit in this case.

    5. Ferno

      Ferno

      almost wish there was a "shrink the image into a box" option in that case, similar to playing DS games on a 3DS

    6. Mad Convoy

      Mad Convoy

      It has to do with resolution. GC games were designed for smaller TVs with less capacity for detail. Even component cables can only do so much.

      Affects a lot of old games, 3D especially since there’s less options than 2D that you can implement to offset the stretchy blur effect. I actually prefer playing N64 games on my WiiU tablet because the screen is small enough that you can get the benefit of higher resolutions without sacrificing the visual quality of the game. But I do think it’s possible to adjust modern TV settings to shrink the amount of screen that the TV is actually displaying stuff on, so you can input the dimensions of a CRT on those settings if it really bothers you (just don’t forget to change the settings back when you switch over to more modern stuff!).

    7. Harkofthewaa

      Harkofthewaa

      @Polkadi~♪ PS1's can't use Component cables. For that you'll have to use a PS2 or PS3 (the former if you have a CRT, the latter as a last resort because the PS3 auto-upscales to whatever resolution you have the TV at and can't handle dithering worth a damn). Now I don't know if Australian TV's have support for RGB SCART, but if they do go for that. RGB is sightly better than Component anyways.

      EDIT: And as for the Gamecube situation... one option is to use a homebrewed Wii U, which can play GC games and upscale them to HD over HDMI at the same time. For more info on that, watch this:

      Now with that being said you'd need a way to rip said Gamecube games but it's still an option.

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