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Blacklightning

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Blacklightning last won the day on March 11

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About Blacklightning

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    I'm back!
  • Birthday 07/06/1988

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  1. latest?cb=20111106063247
    God is just dog spelt backwards.

    Chip is a dog.

    Chip is also a god.

    1. Shaddy Zaphod
    2. Osmium
    3. Blue Blood

      Blue Blood

      What do you get if cross an agnostic, an insomniac and someone that has dyslexia?

      A person that lays awake at night wondering whether or not there is a dog.

  2. https://i.imgur.com/hYENm2X.mp4

    you spin me right round baby

    1. SaturnWolf

      SaturnWolf

      I choked on my drink seeing those few frames the intro from Advance 3 seeped in

  3. I'm not quite sure if I can articulate just how I feel about collectibles as they have been in Sonic games, but I feel that they work best when you don't actively have to go out of your way for them. That's not to say they should be just lying right in the middle of the level instead - far from it. I just feel that as it stands now, they work better when they come as a natural result of being better at a level. A lot of the time, the best examples of this are simply finding an alternate (often better) route through the level and finding a little medal along the way. But a lot of the time, that isn't the case. They tend to be so far out of the way that nothing about discovering or looking for them feels like natural level design, and there's usually no reason to seek them out after that fact because they'll be a small cache of rings at best and a literal dead end at worst. It doesn't help that the collectibles themselves have no further value once already collected, either - at least Special Stage rings gave you enough of a boon to trigger Super Sonic then and there, and that there was more of them in the game than you needed to get all the Chaos Emeralds. I feel like this makes the most sense when you compare them to the green stars in Mario Galaxy 2 - which aren't really integrated into the level design so much as shoved on barely reachable but as of yet unexploited level geometry as an afterthought, like they were just looking to give their level testers more work to do. As for why they haven't dabbled in a more open collectathon, that's pretty simple - Sonic is pretty much designed only to handle well in one direction at a time, and arguably always has been. Sonic Team knows this. Maybe somewhere in there, there's a statement on how ST uses overly linear level design as a crutch, or how they need to rely on springs and boost pads to forcibly change direction, or how there literally has never been a camera system that functions well enough to be able to focus on objects outside your peripheral vision without compromising your ability to jump at the same time. What can be said with certainty is that they would need to greatly rethink and rework the way Sonic interacts with a 3D environment for a Banjo-esque collectathon to even function well, let alone thrive. It's funny that you'd mention Meteor Herd specifically, because the way the level is built, it actually functions better as a point-to-point objective (climbing from the bottom of the level to the ARK high up above) than a series of three random collectibles. One of the main reasons it takes so goddamn long to complete is how long it takes to gain height vs simply being able to fall or drilldive all the way back down to the bottom, to the point that you're essentially repeating the same stretch of level multiple times to scout for emerald shards. Say what you will about emerald hunting as a whole, but it really works to the playstyle's benefit when the level design is mostly lateral - at least that way you can full on sprint through a level until your radar gets a ping.
  4. Your own disagreements aren't license to openly mock people for it, especially if you're going to do so in lieu of contributing to the discussion at all. I'm not going to tell you stop this kind of condescending attitude again - if you can't debate like a normal human being, just don't post.
  5. I felt genuine disgust when Bethesda tried to take credit for inventing Wolfenstein 3D, live on stage. Like, I watched the Devolver Digital conference afterwards, with all it's blood and gore and puke and seizure inducing screen scrambling, and that still filled me with less disgust than Bethesda trying to take all the credit for what was provably ID software's work alone.

    Do they think people were born yesterday or something...? Okay in hindsight these idiots cheering on Elder Scrolls Blades probably gave them that exact impression. Nevermind then.

    1. SupahBerry

      SupahBerry

      These audiences have become organic sitcom laughtracks.

    2. Ryannumber1gamer

      Ryannumber1gamer

      I swear that audience had to be pay for. I refuse to believe people would not only praise Blades, but fucking Fallout

    3. Mad Convoy

      Mad Convoy

      @Ryannumber1gamer To be fair it is actually standard practice for comedians to hire people to laugh at all their jokes regardless of their actual humor, and for live performers in general to hire people to clap for them no matter what. Only theatre seems to be the exception, but even then family and friends of the actors are often offered free seats to shows— a gesture extended in part because family and friends will reliably and proudly support the actors they’re associated with for free. 

      It’s supposed to influence people’s perceptions of the performance and provide the audience a cue for how and when to react. But when done wrong or with a performance that is simply too bad or offensive to sugarcoat, the audience may as well be voicing for a parody of the Big Bang Theory, because their reactions sound canned, detached, and inappropriate. The paid audience members will laugh at set-ups, clap for terrible visuals, etc. in a way that just makes them not believable as happy fans or even curious outsiders.

  6. Not entirely. Most of the PC OST is just MIDI interpretations of the originals with a few odd exceptions. Those off the top of my head being: Knux's theme in Sonic 3, Launch Base, Icecap and Carnival Night. I don't think anything on the Sonic & Knux side of things is affected at all.
  7. Okay, first of all: your argument definitely wasn't "the designs aren't bad because they're different" before. In fact, based on what you were originally responding to, what you suggested was something a lot closer to "they still draw from the same aesthetic". You don't get to back out of that and move the goalposts just because the most basic premise behind that argument is completely laughable. And just to give you an idea of just how laughable that is, that does apply to most of the examples you just gave. Nobody gives a shit what colour Sonic's eyes are nowadays (and even back then it never really kicked up a fuss until Richard Kuta basically made a meme out of it, and by that point I'm pretty sure we were already past 06 if not close to it) because modern and classic Sonic nonetheless shared every other defining visual trait, the same general aesthetic style and many of the same characteristics besides being a little taller and slimmer. I don't think I can break it down any simpler than this: Sonic is a cartoon character. In the move, Sonic is not a cartoon character. The very core of your argument is factually - not just objectively, factually - wrong, and simply giving your argument more words doesn't really address that in any way, shape or form. And while we're on that subject, I'm even going to humour this obvious strawman attempt anyway - yes, movie Sonic is ugly. It doesn't matter a single bit what completely arbitary nitpick makes "sense" in the constraints of the film universe or the self-imposed restrictions the directors designed the film around, because it is in essense a thermian argument - they are in control of all those factors and weren't under any obligation to follow them. Because they did, Sonic's look suffered for it. It's not designed for a live action space, and they butchered his look in order to achieve parity with it. This backlash isn't because of whiny, entitled fans like you seem to be implying - the reveal trailer was actually #1 on trending Youtube for a time, and you're gonna have a pretty hard time convincing anyone the fandom alone has those kinds of numbers or that the video was up that high for any good reason. Thirdly, I can't believe this even needs to be said: fanart isn't official representation of a multi million dollar licensed product. These aren't people competing to be the next big thing in a medium not yet explored by the franchise - this is just a bunch of fans with spare time and a generally niche audience without an intended endgoal. I guarantee you if the same stuff had to be pitched on a AAA level, the response would be much different. It is nonetheless a representative of the games, though, and has no good reason to diverge from them this far. I don't quite know how aware of this you are, but the Sonic movie is an outlier in this regard, not the norm - most decent adaptations at least make an attempt to resemble the thing they're based on, and we have examples as recent as Castlevania and Ratchet and Clank to speak for this. That being said, you're absolutely right about one thing - 06 Sonic did look weird alongside normal-looking people. That has nothing to do with why his design didn't work though - rather it was because of the concious and intentional decision to place him in an environment he obviously contrasted with badly when they were in no way obligated to do so, and doing the movie in live action is something people have consistently advised against for this exact same reason. This isn't a recent complaint either - literally on day one, the moment we heard it was a live action hybrid, most people already knew it was going to weigh down heavily on the movie, even if the extent to which would be up to debate for quite some time. It's honestly fucking ridiculous that you're fishing this hard for ways to pin this on the fans, as if it's somehow our fault Sega can't parse good feedback from the bad. In fact I'd be genuinely surprised if you didn't know full well Dio wasn't suggesting anything this extreme, so I'm going to act on an official capacity for this one - don't do that. If you can't make an argument in good faith without intentionally misrepresenting what other people are saying, how about just don't post at all.
  8. Random shower thought - it's kinda crazy in hindsight how much the original hype around the Sonic movie's director mirrors the introduction of Pontac and Graff. The guy behind the Deadpool film, using a style of humour that doesn't really work that well without extreme violence and adult humour to juxtapose it... versus the guys behind Happy Tree Friends, using a style of humour that doesn't really work that well without extreme violence and adult humour to juxtapose it.

    Shit, maybe next time we'll get Seth Rogan on board and make it a hat trick.

    1. Milo

      Milo

      I see your point, but it’s worth noting Tim Miller stepped away from directing the film. Jeff Fowler is the director (although Miller has remained on the project as an executive producer).

  9. Are you kidding me right now? Just look at them. They're barely alike. It's pretty plain to see they haven't committed to any faithfulness to Sonic's aesthetic, in fact they've only really done the bare minimum required to convince somebody that they're they same character. Adding inconsequential easter eggs to it doesn't really make up for that - it's at best a bandaid designed to distract you from the fact that they could have done a lot better and are perfectly aware of the fact that they could. Just because a complete lack of consistency is expected from Sonic as a character (and frankly I'd argue whether even that is true) doesn't mean it's a particularly good model for developing any kind of entertainment media. You might see it as keeping a formula from going stale, but the truth is closer to keeping it from developing far enough to achieve actual greatness - the only thing this baseless rhetoric ever actually achieved was throwing the baby out with the bathwater.
  10. til gamefreak wants you to sleep with your pokemon

    CmuHtDDWAAApl6d.jpg

    1. Tails spin

      Tails spin

      Inb4Lopunny

    2. Polkadi~☆
    3. NegaMetallix

      NegaMetallix

      That's not even the worst part.

      That Gardevoir only knows Rest, Sleep Talk, and Snore.

      You'll be lucky to get ANY sleep with that racket in the background!

  11. Based on the image quality, the concept looks about Saturn/PS1 era to me. Around then a Green Hill level would actually still have been somewhat novel - in fact the only debatable time it would have come up since is the hub for Sonic Jam I believe? Believe it or not, GHZ's saturation didn't actually start becoming a problem until around Generations - it's a pretty recent problem by comparison. Yawn. Let me know when they actually start making level design around it instead of tech demos. Sonic-esque physics on their own haven't really been a particularly big milestone for years now.
  12. Having finally found some time to buy TSR and play some story mode, two big gripes on my mind.

    - The events that aren't just plain racing are even worse than ASRT's, and that's fucking saying a lot. At least ASRT's were creative, even if they were tedious and annoying - TSR treats you like a fucking idiot if you're not snaking 99.99% of the time, on a level you can't concievably have attained by the time these missions start popping up, and attempting to play them only leaves me struggling to understand where the fuck exactly you're supposed to get that many points from in some of them (seriously, how the shit do you win Daredevil?).

    - The Wisps should not have been in this game. I don't mean that in the usual sense, IE they were stale and overdone even when Lost World did it and don't fit into the game setting - this is a spinoff so I'm willing to grant it more leeway on that. Pick an item, any item from the first two All Star Racing games - nine times out of ten, they'll have a unique colour and unique shape that's usually self-evident as to their function even from your peripheral vision. Example: The obligatory speed boost item in ASRT is a bright purple arrow shape that is identical to the grounded boost pads that perform the same function.

    Wisps don't do that. For starters a lot of them depend on having prior knowledge as to what their original function was, which you stand a pretty good chance of not having because the Wisp games are spread out across like 5 different fucking platforms and often have exclusive wisps to one another, and that's if they even follow them (Eagle comes to mind). Next, a lot of them look fucking identical out of the corner of my eye, and I'm sick of having to just guess whether I just picked up Rocket or Burst because I can't take my eyes off the road, and the same again for Bomb and Void. And lastly, they're basically just... things with no self-evident shape even taking all of that into account, and with the exception of Cube and Ghost they have a really hard time standing out from one another. What should have been a cute stylistic choice has instead just been hours of confusion for me and they honestly would have been much better off just doing items from scratch like the other Sumo titles.

    But hey for what it's worth the racing itself is really nice and the team mechanics are a huge breath of fresh air in what could otherwise have been another shameless Mario Kart clone. I kinda wish drift boosting didn't feel so weak compared to slingshotting, but honestly I can't tell whether that's because I'm doing them wrong or because of my character choices (they've all been Technique racers so far). Hopefully people are still playing it online by the time I'm done with story.

    1. Blue Blood

      Blue Blood

      Some of the Wisp icons may be confusing (burst and rocket are mentioned a lot), but i personally don't have this issue. The game also includes tutorials and an in game manual (plus loading screen tutorials) to explain the functions of them all. In terms of functions, I can't agree that they're confusing or poorly conveyed to the player. Maybe not as obvious as the example you mentioned regarding boosts, but it takes only a short while to learn what things do. If you were to play Mario Kart for the first time with only some prior knowledge of regular Mario games, you'd expect Mushrooms to make you grow and the difference between green shells and red shells wouldn't be at all obvious. 

      The non-racing missions are really poorly designed. They basically all are drifting challenges. When it comes to daredevil (the worst of the worst), you have to drift through the gates as close to the star post as possible, but without actually hitting the star post. The yellow side grants you points, the red side grants you points and a multiplier. The closer you get to the star post, the more points you get. IIRC there's only one mandatory daredevil challenge. It took me an age to get through. In videos I've watched on YouTube, I've seen a number of people not read the instructions on the race intro. Dunno if that applies to you, but... Read them.

    2. Sega DogTagz

      Sega DogTagz

      I think the item confusion is bunk too. It takes only a trivial knowledge of kart racers to figure out what each one does. You only have to throw 1 or two rockets to realize its purpose. And if for some reason you still cant figure it out, the loading screens baby feed you that info, the manual included with the game describes every wisp and half of them do some variation of what they do in franchise anyway.

      Its not rocket science. Mario Kart has been around long enough that anyone should be able to instantly figure out how to use eagle once they've gotten their hands on it once or twice.

    3. JezMM

      JezMM

      Definitely agree on Burst and Rocket but that's it unfortunately, Blue Blood's Mario Kart comparison is very apt regarding the items. I get where folks are coming from because when I first started the game I was kinda bad at it and impatient to gain the same level of familiarity that I have with Mario Kart when it comes to the items, but I knew I'd get there after an hour or two.

       

      But yeah the daredevil missions suck and the obsession with drifting to gain bonus points in all but the destruction missions is annoying.

    4. Soniman

      Soniman

      Yeah the wisps came to me pretty easily after a bit. A quick glance is all I need to understand what it does which is pat the course for all power up using kart racers 

  13. This question seems to crop back up practically every time the design is mentioned in this thread, and for the life of me I'm struggling to imagine what other answers you're expecting to hear besides "corporate greed" and "focus tested stupidity". The people making decisions pretty plainly have no idea what the hell they're doing, because if they did they never would have let it get this far. =V
  14. One need only look at Braid for a case in point of this. Pretty much all the assets iirc were hand drawn, and sure it might look pretty in motion, but it also took them something like four years to get a game done this way between their small, two person team. In fact this isn't even just true of indie games. Though they were still technically sprites, one of the Guilty Gear games (forget which one, other than that I know it was before Xrd) made them in such high resolution that they were basically direct rips of their reference drawings, and someone on the team went on record that making graphics this way tended to get things done at roughly one frame per day, even with the resources they had over an indie group. Power to the guys that wanna go all out on graphics, but most people making games on their own aren't making them for that reason. A lot of budding developers will want to focus their attention elsewhere on merits they can compete better with, gameplay or story devices probably being the two most obvious ones. This is kind of an unfair comparison. SA1 doesn't fail to hold up because its polygons are dated, it fails to hold up because its artstyle is dated. That's as true of pixel art as it is of 3D art. There are some pretty dated 3D games that still hold up to this day because they're simply appealing to the eye despite (or sometimes even because of) the limitations of the day, just as much as there are 2D games from the 8 and 16 bit eras that look like pixellated vomit. I mean fucking hell, just look at the very next game after that. Artstyle trumps technical power every time, and that's true of any medium. Worst case, you might sometimes spot a creative shortcut the developers made to make things look more appealing than they are (most common example of this era would probably be 2D cutouts in crowds just of the top of my head), but I don't think I've ever thought less of a game's looks because of them.
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