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The Sonic Generations Review Topic

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http://www.sonicretro.org/2011/11/so...-retro-review/

Well written review for Sonic retro. It brought up problems in the game, like rolling, some modern levels are boost to win. Retro has always been good site.

Oh look, they didn't like the Modern era too much.

Oh look, they complain that if you boost in the game, unless you know the level design, you'll die in later levels.

Oh look, Slingerland in the Second Opinion is just being a Classic Fanboy.

Tell me when Retro actually learns that Classic Sonic is just Modern Sonic, except younger and also that Classic Sonic being in a game =/= Amazing game.

Edited by Darkspine Inferno

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Oh look, they didn't like the Modern era too much.

Oh look, they complain that if you boost in the game, unless you know the level design, you'll die in later levels.

Oh look, Slingerland is just being a Classic Fanboy.

Tell me when Retro actually learns that Classic Sonic is just Modern Sonic, except younger and also that Classic Sonic being in a game =/= Amazing game.

Retro's Generations review isn't done by Slingerland. Slingerland did TSS' review. Hence why I said Retro's was much better.

Edited by Neon

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Oh look, they complain that if you boost in the game, unless you know the level design, you'll die in later levels.

I don't really have that problem with Generations. I don't really have to know the level design very well to know when to use the boost and the modern levels themselves are still very easy to S rank.

Edited by sonfan1984

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I don't really have that problem with Generations. I don't really have to know the level design very well to know when to use the boost and the modern levels themselves are still very easy to S rank.

I didn't find this so much either. In Unleashed it felt as though I had to have the majority of a level memorised in order to play through it smoothly, while in Generations I found myself able to react in time a lot more. I'm not sure if this is due in part to my increased experience with the gameplay style however.

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http://nintendo-okie...ions-pc-review/

Green Hills. Badninks. Blisteringly fast speeds. These were the first features that gamers were presented with back in 1991 when a blue hedgehog called Sonic hit store shelves in what would become one of the most celebrated games of all time. The huge success of the originalSonic the Hedgehog spawned a franchise, which expanded beyond the games into print and animated forms, while retaining the core feature of a hedgehog battling against a greater evil. It has been 20 years now since Dr Robotnik, or Eggman as he is now unfortunately known, was first defeated by Sonic, and over those years Sonic has had a ride so rough that many mascots would have fallen by the wayside. Sonic however, has persevered, and Sonic Generations is a testament to the strengths and longevity of one of gaming’s most celebrated mascots.

It currently seems to be the big thing in the industry to issue re-releases to celebrate a nominal figure of years since the debut of a series, but SEGA clearly felt Sonic deserved more.Sonic Generations is in no way a simple re-release or re-build of an existing game. Instead it is a carefully constructed love letter to the fans of the series who have stuck with it so long; it is a game that will bring to the forefront of your mind every nostalgic moment you have had with the hedgehog over the past 20 years, and more importantly, it is a game that you will cherish every single moment playing with a huge grin on your face. Quite simply, it is a masterpiece in not only referential nostalgia, but also in design.

What You Need To Know

Sonic Generations is a tour through 20 years of Sonic the Hedgehog history, featuring re-imagined takes on some of the most iconic stages from the games that have made up this amazing series. Each stage can be played in either 2D or 3D, thanks to a clever Classic/Modern Sonic dynamic.

Classic and Modern Sonic

The big feature that Sonic Generations is touting is the ability to play as both Classic and Modern Sonic, or to put it in terms of gameplay, Mega Drive 2D style and Unleashed 3D style. This not only means you get twice the game for your money, but SEGA really have appealed to everyone here – after years of fans clamouring for a return to 2D Sonic, they’ve got it, along with the more modern style of play which through extensive fine-tuning, is approaching perfection. Both types of gameplay are mandatory to complete the game, as every stage has an act for each style, but the amount of time you spend in either mode outside of the acts in the numerous missions is entirely up to you. If you hate 3D Sonic then you can go ahead and stick to 2D, but be warned, you are missing out on half the game, and perhaps, the better half.

The most important thing to note about Classic (2D) Sonic is that he handles very similarly to the Mega Drive games, and not at all like the physics failure that was Sonic the Hedgehog 4: Episode 1. The result is a pleasing style of gameplay that harkens back to simpler times, with the spin dash realistically being Sonic’s only ability outside the standard run and jump. The 2D levels themselves are all extremely enjoyable to play too, making use of new features that have been brought into the series, and also the increased speed that is available thanks to improved hardware.

Modern Sonic, thanks to repeated panning by critics, does not have such a kind legacy in the gameplay department, but building upon the hugely successful style adopted inUnleashed and honed in Colours, SEGA have finally got it right. Quite simply, the 3D Modern Sonic stages are absolutely brilliant, and the sense of speed is mind-blowing. Modern Sonic brings with him homing attacks, slides and drifts along with the hugely powerful boost gauge, but never feels out of control. The controls are finally at a point where you can be travelling at ridiculous speeds but you still feel in control and you can still make well timed platforming moves. At low speeds Sonic still doesn’t handle brilliantly, feeling cumbersome when getting up to speed, but thanks to some brilliant level design this rarely happens.

Great Stage Design

The overall design has also seen significant improvements, something fans who turned away after the terrible Sonic 06 will be pleased to hear. The 2D and 3D levels flow extremely well, with the high paths requiring pin-point accuracy to reach, and the low paths offering a safer, albeit slower alternative. One of the major improvements in level design is the removal of unfairly placed bottomless pits, with levels now being more multi-layered to get you back into the action, but with a time penalty rather than just throwing you back to a checkpoint via a cheap death. Of course there are still bottomless pits, but falling into these is mainly the result of carelessness on your part, rather than poor design like we have seen before.

The stages themselves are also helped by the stunning graphics. Sonic has never looked this good, and the re-imagined stages will bring a tear to the eye of even the most hardened Sonic veteran. Seeing Green Hill Zone sprawl out before you in 3D is simply amazing, as is the drop from Rooftop Run’s Clock Tower, or the Death Egg rising in the background of Sky Sanctuary. Every stage is thematically based on the original, with segments being remixed into entirely new designs, meaning you will have déjà vu, but without repeating something you did years ago exactly. Everything is beautiful, vibrant and bursting with life, and when the game runs at full speed, it looks absolutely stunning, even if the stages are zipping by quickly.

Nostalgic Stages and Longevity

The game features a total of 9 stages which are entered through a surprisingly enjoyable hub world, each of which features two acts, one for each Sonic, and a further 5 optional missions for each Sonic to complete later on. While this may not seem a lot, a grand total of 90 missions awaits you at any point during the game, which challenge you to complete levels under certain conditions, with the aid of one of Sonic’s friends, to beat a Doppelganger or any other number of variations that Sonic Team have thought up, extending the life of the game significantly. The variation in the stage selection is also good to see, with one stage from each major game appearing, ranging from classics such as Chemical Plant Zone to the more modern levels such as City Escape and Planet Wisp. It really is a tour through the history of Sonic, and it feels great to revisit such iconic locales.

There are also a handful of boss and rival battles to complete which serve as dividers between eras of games. This unfortunately means that there are only 3 boss and 3 rival battles in the entire game (not including the final boss), and these don’t last a huge length of time, or pose much of a challenge either. The rival battles feel more like rush stages, with Shadow’s stage being the notable stand-out battle, while the bosses feel little more than small sidetracks from the main game, with Perfect Chaos in particular being a walkover. Nonetheless, they mark important moments in the series, and fans will absolutely love it.

Plot makes little sense

Of course, being a Sonic game it does have a plot, and this is where Generations becomes a little unstuck. Whereas Colours was a fun romp through a theme park with some genuinely witty dialogue holding it together, Generations attempts to make sense of what is going on, then sporadically decides to cast it aside in favour of presenting you with more stages. What you’re left with is a plot that gets going in certain places, stops for a few hours, then suddenly adds a bit more. For example, the game opens with Sonic’s friends being sucked into time holes by a mysterious enemy, Time Eater, and for no reason, dropped outside conveniently placed gateways to historic levels. Sonic and Tails are confused why they are there, but decide to solve it by just running through the levels. Now I know this is no Mass Effect, but surely one of the characters has some reservations about what is happening, and the fact that Classic Sonic appearing isn’t even mentioned, he just arrives, is baffling. Thankfully the plot is explained right at the end (somewhat), but a lack of exposition throughout hurts the progression through it. There is however some great self-referential dialogue (“This place seems awfully familiar…” – Sonic at Green Hill Zone) but it is used so rarely that it really is a missed opportunity from a writing team that wrote some of the best Sonic dialogue for Colours.

Stunning Soundtrack

Despite all of this though, the star attraction here is the music. Every level features a classic and modern remix of their original tune, and thanks to some incredible mixing from Jun Senoue and the team at SEGA, the new mixes sound absolutely incredible. Classic Rooftop Run is absolutely magical to listen to, and you need a heart of stone to not cheerily sing along to the Classic City Escape remix. But that’s not all. Through the collection of red star rings in acts or by completing missions, you can unlock some of the most iconic tracks in the entire series, which can then be played instead of the original track in any level. Want to blaze through Green Hill Zone while listening to Sonic Free Rider’s title track, Free? You can. And it’s amazing. Throw in there an absolute mountain of other collectibles including artwork and character bios, and you have a game that encapsulates everything Sonic.

Conclusion

This is a true celebration for Sonic fans. Sonic Generations is not just a simple look back at the series’ long history, it is a landmark moment in the franchise that will not only mark the moment when Sonic became a member of the 20+ club, but will also mark the moment where Sonic moved back from good to incredible again. We’ve had some rough years, but the constant increase in quality started byUnleashed and passed on through Colours has continued once again with Generations. Throw in there more nostalgia that you would ever think was possible to put in a game, and you have a solid foundation for which the next 20 years can build from. And if the next 20 years are anything like the past 20, we’re in for a wild ride. Happy Birthday Sonic!

4/5 Lumas

Edited by Razor Wind

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I'm still puzzled with GameStop's only main con of the game, 'switching between two Sonics was confusing.' How is switching confusing? Was it that confusing that it made the game hard? Generations is one of the easiest Sonic games to date, just behind Colors.

Edited by Crystaline Starlight

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I'm still puzzled with GameStop's only main con of the game, 'switching between two Sonics was confusing.' How is switching confusing? Was it that confusing that it made the game hard? Generations is one of the easiest Sonic games to date, just behind Colors.

There's an easy button for that.

*press Y!*

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