Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Badnik Mechanic

Boy aged 7 accused of being a racist by his school

Recommended Posts

This is a story which has actually happened... .. .. oh great... in my hometown, so the story is quite big here right now, chances are it's going to go national if the council/school keeps acting the way it is or if the media keeps hyping it up like it has.

Theres a Primary School in Hull called Griffin Primary School, and for those outside the UK, Primary school kids are usually aged between 5-12(?).

The story is, that a 7 year old asked this question to a 5 year old... "Are you brown because you came from Africa?"

So how did the school go about handling the situation?

They took both the boys out of lessons, called both the parents and told them that their children had been involved in 'a racist incident' the parents arrived and the mother of the boy was told that she had to sign a form which more or less said 'your son is a racist.'

Like... wow.

Originally, it was being reported that it was the mother of the 5 year old who complained about this incicent to the school, now it's come to light she didn't complain and has also said that she didn't believe it to be racist at all.

So whats going on now? Well... the local MP has got involved saying he doesn't believe it to be racism... the local radio stations have had open phone lines all day letting... sigh... the people have their say (although the vast majority which didn't think there was anything racist about it at all). Tonight on Look North they had a representative of race relations on the show and he said he didn't think it was racist and that the school completely failed in how it handled the incident.

The school itself has said "We have to report all racist incidents and have procedures to follow."

So... does anyone else here think that the school might have possibly... could have slightly... over-reacted in the most outrageous sense!? They practically branded a 7 year old child a racist for asking what sounds like an innocent childish question, called both parents into the school and almost forcing his mother to sign a form admitting that he was a racist.

Opinions anyone?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They do know the kid who said that is seven, right?

Not only that, but it wasn't even a racist comment. If anything I guess it might have been "stereotypical" or something along those lines, but it's not even the least bit racist. A racist comment would have been something to be taken offense to, not..where you were born. The fact that the school actually went through so much trouble for something like a comment made by a kid who probably doesn't even know the word "racism" is pretty damn sad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I wouldn't say that his age automatically disqualifies him from being able to be accused of being offensive (kids CAN be that spiteful at that age), that comment wouldn't be what I would consider grounds for accusation. It's just the kid being naive, in this case.

Edited by krazystitch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think we're all under no illusion that even at 7 someone can be racist as well as being a royal little pain in the arse if they wanted to be, however if they fully understand what they're saying or why it's so hurtful is another debate altogether.

But I think if this kid wanted to be racist, he wouldn't have said what he did. To me it sounds like someone with a most basic understanding of cultures trying to find out why that boy is different to him.

Now speaking with some local knowledge here, Griffin is not a rough school at all, it was nothing like what I went to, and believe me, even at 7 if someone wanted to really be cruel then they're more than capable of doing so.

The fact that the school actually went through so much trouble for something like a comment made by a kid who probably doesn't even know the word "racism" is pretty damn sad

According to one of the articles I linked to, he doesn't.

Edited by Hogfather

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But the part you didn't quote agreed with what you 'argued'. He could have been racist at his age, but that particular comment was not an example of racism, so this shouldn't have happened.

Alright then, I apologize for making it seem like I was going up against what you said or anything like that, I'll edit the post now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm just wondering... had the mother signed the form. What exactly happens next? Does the son get taken out of school? Is he forever known as '***** the racist'?

What exactly was that supposed to do?

Good grief, someone make a topic about kittens or something.

Yeah sure, just wait a moment I'll cook something up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excuse my French, but how the fuck is that racist? He asked the other young boy a logical yet naive question.

319047856_dbf1ef3e92.jpg?1310103722

Like Hunico said the boy is just curious and said it in the naivest way possible, because you know he is seven!smile.png

Edited by BW199148

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Um...disproportionate much?

They couldn't tell him that saying that was offensive and he shouldn't do it again? Unless he has a history of this, they're carrying it too far for a comment like that. He should recieve a warning before they decide to take action like that.

This only goes to show how oversensitive people are being. I bet it has something to do with that racist woman on the tram that caused people to be more concerned towards any perceived racism.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was seven, I once asked a friend of my dad's "Where can I get that dark skin" because all the mosquitos were bothering me and not him. Was I racist? No. Was I naive? yes.

honestly, they're kids and one asked a naive question. They're little kids, they're just curious about the world and naive. Not racist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hate when things like this happen, because it gives actual racists ammo to use. They look at a story like this and generalize, positing that every complaint of racism must be equally frivolous. No doubt, genuine bigots love it when childish naivete or innocent queries are quickly branded as racism, because they can point at us and go "Aha, see? You politically correct types accuse everything of being racism, so our comments are just as valid as this child's are!"

I'm all for calling out racism where I see it, but this simply doesn't qualify. It dilutes the definition of racism so much that it's only going to make it more difficult for us to condemn actual racism when it occurs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm kind of curious of what the other kid's reaction was.

Well do little kids these days till believe in the stork?

If yes perhaps he asked if the Stork brought him from Africa instead of Paris.

Though seriously, in the second article linked it does say the boy was upset about the question.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

INB4 Political Correctness Gone Mad.

To me, this is a complete non-story, almost as much as that women wot put a cat in a wheely bin. The only thing it shows is that the people working at that school are complete fucking numpties, clearly incapable of any sort of rational thought.

Idiots doing idiot things. Big fucking whoop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

You must read and accept our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy to continue using this website. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.