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Marvel Cinematic Universe | AVENGERS ENDGAME | APRIL 26th, 2019

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Huh

 

If this means what I think it means, damn..... 

 

I loved Peggy in the Captain America stuff. I guess she was old so it was a matter of time but still....damn. D:

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Well, I finally got around to see Age of Ultron, and I'm not sure what to think about it right now. It isn't as if I didn't like it. I just don't think it lived up to all the hype. And that's not the film's fault. I guess I expected more of a divergence from the formula, but the movie often felt like a retread. I praise the fact that Whedon was able to fit in so much characters, and give each of them plenty to do.  Age of Ultron could have been a complete disaster, but thankfully somebody with talent was at the helm. I still think Whedon can easily carry a screenplay with his patented wit, wry humor, and deft characterization.

 

Then again, there were times when I felt the comedy was a bit out of place and unnecessary. Honestly, my favorite scenes were the ones in which there was little action. I'd rather just watch them all banter for two hours. Whedon really shines as a writer when the action slows down to give way for more character growth. Unfortunately, I wasn't too fond of the many action scenes. It was often hard to tell what was happening given all the flying shards of shattered glass. I think I zoned out when Iron Man fought The Hulk. It wasn't a bad fight scene, per se. I just found it hard to engage with the whole fight.

 

Anyway, it wasn't a bad film by any stretch, but it didn't do anything in my mind to really break the mold. I still think Winter Soldier is the best movie in the MCU, but AoU is still among the top additions.

 

Also, I'm not sure if Quicksilver will stay dead given precedence. Death doesn't seem to have much permanence in the MCU unless you're a villain who isn't Loki. Personally, I wanted to know more about him over the course of many movies. I felt like it was silly to kill him off in his first MCU title. Honestly, I thought Whedon was ready to kill Hawkeye. I don't put it past the guy to kill somebody with a wife and kids. Joss Whedon will kill everyone you love.

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that scarlet witch don't seem to be wearing no scarlet much at all

 

I don't mind the casual "not a super hero uniform" look, even welcome it, but I like colour coding at least

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http://www.ign.com/articles/2015/06/02/rumor-charlize-theron-as-captain-marvel-angelina-jolie-to-direct

Looks like Charlize Theron is in the running for Major Carol Danvers aka Captain Marvel which i think is just the most perfect casting. Angelina Jolie is also being rumored to direct the film. 

And also, here's a fun new Ant-Man spot 

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Ladies and gentleman we've got our Punisher:

 

 

Netflix's "Daredevil" series will add another major Marvel vigilante to its ranks in its second season: The Punisher, as played by "The Walking Dead" alum Jon Bernthal.

Here's Marvel Television's official description of The Punisher: "a vigilante who aims to clean up New York City’s Hell’s Kitchen by any means necessary, no matter how lethal the results."

 

The Punisher -- and his iconic skull logo -- is one of Marvel's most recognizable characters, and has been depicted three times previously in live-action films; by Dolph Lundgren (1989) Thomas Jane (2004) and Ray Stevenson in (2008). Bernthal played Shane Walsh on the first two seasons of "The Walking Dead," and has appeared on the big screen in "The Wolf of Wall Street" and Fury."

 

http://www.comicbookresources.com/article/jon-bernthal-to-play-the-punisher-on-daredevil-season-2

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So My Mom and 2 sisters got to see the 6 minute preview of Ant-man in the converted Bug's Life Theater(they have the Ant-Man suit there!) pretty sure its the imax preview. They said they enjoyed it, and it was funny(though my Sis also said it was a little weird, but funny) 

 

We got some interesting interviews on Ant-Man(I've seen this split up over places, but IGN had it all together. Some of it could be considered semi-spoilery, so I'll put it in spoilers.

http://www.ign.com/articles/2015/06/22/ant-man-set-and-edit-bay-visit-making-marvels-underdog-movie

 

Ant-Man Set and Edit Bay Visit: Making Marvel's Underdog Movie

 

311
We get a bug's-eye view of creating Earth's Tiniest Hero.

 

By Max NicholsonAs one of Marvel's longest-gestating projects (even predating the first Iron Man), Ant-Man is "The Little Superhero Movie That Could." For years (and years), writer-director Edgar Wright worked with Marvel Studios to get his vision for the tiniest Avenger on the big screen, but in May 2014 the filmmaker left the project, citing creative differences with the studio. It wasn't long before Peyton Reed was brought on-board to take his place, mere months before shooting.

 

 

Domestic Trailer #2

02:29

 

However, this turned out to be a great thing for the creative team, who embraced a more collaborative approach. It also lent to the underdog nature of the film, which stars the second, lesser-known Ant-Man, Scott Lang (Paul Rudd), and features original Ant-Man Hank Pym (Michael Douglas), who mentors Scott and recruits him for a dangerous heist. Of course, Ant-Man still had its work cut out for it, especially coming off this summer's Avengers: Age of Ultron, but Marvel doesn't shy away from a challenge.

IGN's Summer 2015 Movie Preview

Knowing that, we were equal parts intrigued and excited to visit the Ant-Man set in Atlanta last August, accompanied by a group of other outlets. There, we got to speak with director Peyton Reed, Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige, and stars Paul Rudd, Michael Douglas, Evangeline Lilly and Corey Stoll, and also got a firsthand look at the production. Then, just a few days ago, we were invited to the Ant-Man editing bay at ILM to check out finished scenes from the movie. Here's what we learned (and although we're on our best behavior here, we're nevertheless issuing a SPOILER warning):

 

Why Ant-Man Deserves His Own Movie

 

Contrary to popular belief, Ant-Man is actually the final film in Marvel's Phase 2 (not Ultron), which puts it in the curious position of marking that cinematic end. So why exactly was now the right time to come out with Ant-Man? Well, according to Feige, a lot of it had to do with timing, noting its release pattern of "a new story on existing characters" (à la Captain America: The Winter Soldier in 2014) and "a new story on new characters" (à la Guardians of the Galaxy, also in 2014). "So it did sort of feel like the right rhythm, to bring [Ant-Man] to the screen," he said, coming off an Avengers movie.

That said, the question still remains: Why is Ant-Man deserving of his own movie when characters like Black Widow, Hawkeye and Nick Fury still haven't gotten their own solo outings?

 

Is Ant-Man Too Small For The Big Screen? - The Superhero Show

17:58

"I think a lot of it is based on what story we want to tell," Feige answered. "In this one, it goes back to the first pitch we got from [Edgar Wright and Joe Cornish] in two-thousand-whatever-it-was, which was this history of Pym, independent of The Avengers, independent of a lot of his comic backstory, and having a mentor-to-mentee relationship. It was unique then -- it was a cool idea -- and it's even more unique now, because we've made [11] movies, and none of them feature that kind of relationship. None of them have the passing of the mantle, which is much of what this movie is about."

The fun of playing into the tropes of a heist film is cool, in the same way that playing into '70s thrillers was fun in The Winter Soldier.

He continued, "There's a lot of backstory to get across in this movie and what Hank did in his past. We see some of it; we hear about a lot of it. But it's not about the trial and error of inventing the Pym Particle. The Pym Particle's invented. He has been on adventures as Ant-Man, as we'll see in this movie, beforehand. Frankly, we can focus more on the character stuff instead of the science stuff, to focus on this criminal, this smart guy, this good guy: Scott Lang."

Feige also emphasized the heist premise, which is totally unique and different from most Marvel movies. "The fun of playing into the tropes of a heist film is cool, in the same way that playing into '70s thrillers was fun in The Winter Soldier," he said.

Reed later mentioned that the heist angle also plays into Scott's backstory as a reformed criminal. "He's a guy who I think gets adrenalized by the idea of a heist or job or something like that," Reed explained. "So he's conflicted about that, and it's led him to make some really terrible life choices that he's trying to change, and he's struggling to stay on the straight and narrow. I like the idea that he's a conflicted person and also that he doesn't inherently have superpowers. It's the suit, it's the particle technology, and he's very, very reluctantly pulled into this situation."

Bringing Family to Marvel

Another unique thing about Ant-Man is the family dynamic. As some fans have noticed, Scott Lang and Hank Pym are the only MCU heroes with children to consider. (A case could be made for Hawkeye post-Age of Ultron, but he doesn't have his own solo movie, at least not yet.) This puts a unique spin on the typical Marvel movie, especially in terms of character relationships.

Evangeline Lilly, Paul Rudd and Michael Douglas in Ant-Man

 

Evangeline Lilly, Paul Rudd and Michael Douglas in Ant-Man

"We meet [scott] as he's leaving prison, as he's getting released from prison for the first time. We figure he's been in for four or five years," Feige explained. "His daughter is six, so he doesn't have much of a relationship with her, and he very much wants a relationship with her. But he can't hold down a job, and he can't pay child support, and his wife [played by Judy Greer] has married a police officer [bobby Cannavale], who just makes it all worse for him. And he begrudgingly -- and he's very upset about it -- returns to a life of crime to get enough money to pay his child support, to be able to see his daughter. Ultimately, that's what Hank sort of plays off of to try to pull him into his scheme."

Hope and her father don't get along very well and haven't for many, many years -- kind of haven't for most of her life.

Meanwhile, Hank has his own daughter to think about, Hope van Dyne, who's a senior board member at Pym Technology and edged her father out years ago. "Hank hasn't been around for a very long time," Lilly explained. "Hope and her father don't get along very well and haven't for many, many years -- kind of haven't for most of her life. They've been sort of thrust together because of circumstances right now, but it doesn't mean that they like it."

"He's sort of a Northern California, formal guy," Douglas said of Hank. "He's lost control of his company. He lives in sort of a time warp. He was always a bit of a tinkerer. He's got a lab, plus a lot of other stuff, in his basement that we find out about. He's certainly bitter about what happened with his company and deeply scared of what the future might hold -- because he himself, after having gotten small so many times, it's difficult. He looks and tries to find a guy that he can work with and has the right characteristics, which is [scott]."

As Peyton oh-so keenly pointed out to us, "It's sort of this parallel story of these guys who have their daughters, and they've made some choices in their lives that have not been good, and sort of trying to find redemption in that."

Michael Douglas and Corey Stoll in Ant-Man

 

Michael Douglas and Corey Stoll in Ant-Man

Meanwhile, Hank's former protege Darren Cross, played by Stoll, is now head of Pym Tech and has big plans to develop Pym's particle technology for his own nefarious ends -- that is until Hank and Scott team up to thwart those plans. In some ways, Stoll noted, Darren and Scott have their own "familial" rivalry to sort out with Hank. "I think they're competing siblings, competing for the father figure's love," he said. "I think Scott's not as aware of this competition as I am, but there can only be room for one... [Darren] wants Pym to tell him that he's proud of him. That's what it's all about."

Ant-Man's Unique Collaborative Process

Behind the scenes, one important thing to note is that both Rudd and Rudd's Anchorman director Adam McKay played a huge part in the initial rewrite of Ant-Man's script, following Wright's departure.

"It kind of came about organically," Rudd explained. "It was never part of the plan. When Edgar and Marvel parted ways, there had been a rewrite that was a different take but wasn't there. So when we were meeting directors and all sorts of stuff, Adam came in. Obviously Adam and I have a pretty good relationship, so it just came about. It was never anything that I think either one of us had planned on. It was really just an issue of 'This movie is going to start, and this script needs to get to a place that Marvel wants to take it.' So we just spent some time working on it together."

Ant-Man director Peyton Reed

Ant-Man director Peyton Reed

Shortly thereafter, Reed was hired to direct, and he offered his own contributions to the script. "When I read the different drafts, I definitely had a strong point of view of what I felt worked really, really well and what I felt didn't work so well," the filmmaker said of Wright and Cornish's take on the story. "Obviously there was a lot of fantastic conceptual and character stuff that was there, but for me a lot of it just needed to be moved in a different direction.

 

One of my big concerns about coming in on such short notice was, 'How much am I going to be able to put myself into the movie?' And I've been really pleased with the process.

"Script-wise, the stuff that Edgar and Joe did, that's the spine of the movie: it's a heist movie, and it's sort of the passing of the torch from Hank to Scott... But the treatment of it, tonally, I think is one of the [big] things that changed. In terms of the visualization, there were obviously months and months of stuff [that had already been] done... One of my big concerns about coming in on such short notice was, 'How much am I going to be able to put myself into the movie?' And I've been really pleased with the process."

Even some of the actors chipped in on the script. For example, Lilly worked extensively with Rudd to flesh out Hope.

"I was lucky enough to have gotten involved in the film when they were still rewriting it from the original Edgar Wright draft," Lilly explained. "I met with Paul in New York City before they came out with the official new draft. So I got a chance to say, 'Hey, why don't you beef up my character [Laughs] and give her a really full arc?'

"I think one of the things that's easy to have happen in a superhero story is, the female character -- whether she be a heroine or not -- can often be just the wart on the man, you know? She's just an accompaniment, she's there when he's there, and there is no real arc or story for her. There is such an appetite in the comic book world to see fully realized, fully developed female characters, and Marvel is very supportive of that."

Behold...

 

Behold...

Lilly also said that Hope gets in on more of the action now, thanks to the rewrites. "She gets some physical stuff. She didn't originally. That was one of the additions that came through me making suggestions and Marvel coming back and going, 'Wait until you see what we did!' [Laughs] They've made her a pretty physically capable character."

Stoll was also a part of the writing process, developing his villainous character Darren Cross, aka Yellow Jacket. "Even though this is by far the biggest movie I've been in, I feel like it's one of the most collaborative," he said. "When Peyton first came on board and we had a new draft, we sat down for hours and just talked about the character. He took those notes back to Adam and Paul, and it was a great back-and-forth."

It's All About the Suit(s)

 

While in Atlanta, one of the set pieces we got to sit in on was the big helicopter fight between Ant-Man and Yellow Jacket, seen in some of the trailers. For us, this was first time we got to see Rudd in the Ant-Man suit, and the actor graciously visited us in between takes to show it off in all its glorious detail.

"Literally, you put it on, you can't help but feel kinda cool," Rudd told us, giddy as a schoolboy. "It's a superhero suit, and it's a really good one too. The first time I ever put it on, which was in a fitting -- and there were several fittings -- you stand differently. It just feels like a suit, and because of that, working from the outside in, everything starts to change. It's pretty cool."

Hangin' out.

 

Hangin' out.

Rudd also joked, "It's a very specific kind of feeling stupid, acting in general. You just feel kind of stupid doing it anyway. But when you're pretending to be rolling around and dodging a foot or talking to and riding an ant or something -- and you're really having to do it seriously, and there's nothing there -- you've got to put faith in the process."

It's probably one of the most difficult suits we've had to do.

Helping along with that process were Ant-Man costume designers Sammy Sheldon (V for Vendetta, Kick-Ass, X-Men: First Class) and Ivo Coveney (Star Wars Prequels, Kick-Ass, X-Men: First Class), who explained to us how the Ant-Man costume was made. They also showed us their many, many duplicates, which included 13 suits, 15 belts and 17 helmets -- some created for hero shots, some for stunts and others for various stages in between.

"It's probably one of the most difficult suits we've had to do," Sheldon said of Ant-Man's costume. That's because it's made up of both fabric and hard pieces, which made it difficult to streamline into one suit. For example, the tubes running through all the seams had to be both metallic and flexible.

That's not to mention the helmets, which were comprised of 54 separate pieces each -- all drawn up in CAD, 3D printed and assembled one piece at a time. "We know every single part because we built every single part," Coveney explained. "So when they say, 'You've got 20 minutes to do that,' I know how to get that part and get it back together in 20 minutes." (The 3D printer, he noted, saved them tons of time.)

Ant-Man in Ant-Man

 

Ant-Man in Ant-Man

Adding to that was the fact that Hank Pym created the suit decades before the movie takes place (modern day), which meant it had to have a tactile, functional feel. "I kept thinking of Star Trek's vision for future, trying to do things in that way, deliberately making everything just a little bit too chunky," Coveney said. "It just works really nicely."

Creating Yellow Jacket: The Anti-Ant-Man Suit

According to Feige, the helicopter scene is also the first time in the movie when Darren Cross puts on the Yellow Jacket suit, which -- as opposed to Ant-Man's suit -- was completely CGI. "The Yellow Jacket has to be created in a very different way, because [Ant-Man's] is sort of a nostalgic, 1960s suit," Sheldon said. "The Yellow Jacket is meant to be the other end of the spectrum, so it's totally high-tech. With this, we had to create a suit for the actor, that is a motion-capture suit."

Indeed, Stoll was performing in green spandex that day in Atlanta, so we didn't get to see the Yellow Jacket in action. However, the team did show us concept art of the suit (the one that made the rounds online a few months ago), as well as a pre-vis storyboard video of the helicopter scene. "I think everyone was on the same page," Stoll said of the on-set material. "The pre-vis was really helpful. I was sitting with Peyton and Russell [Carpenter], the cinematographer, and the special effects guys, and we were all getting giddy and fanboy-ish ourselves. We realized, 'Yeah, that's the moment.'"

Ant-Man vs. Yellow Jacket on Cross's private helicopter.

Ant-Man vs. Yellow Jacket on Cross's private helicopter.

As for the motion-capture and spandex, the actor confessed, "It's a double-edged sword, because I'm more comfortable -- it takes less time to get in and out of it than Paul's does, and the end result will be cooler than any actual, physical substance could be, in terms of the way everything will move."

Stoll continued, "It gives you some confidence that you're not just going to be Señor Bumblebee [Laughs], because that's sort of what you feel like. I don't know if you saw my stand-in, who has the antennas with the pingpong balls. Luckily, I don't have to wear that. But yeah, you don't feel quite the badass when you step into the suit, but when you realize that you've got probably the best possible team in the world behind you to make you look like a badass, it sort of gives you the license to have a little bit of swagger."

Months later, at ILM, Reed recalled our visit in Atlanta and was excited to show us a more completed but still-in-progress version of the helicopter scene, which to my eyes looked just about finished. (The image just above is a screen grab from that very same sequence, and bits and pieces of it have been shown in the trailers.) Not surprisingly, the ILM team really outdid themselves here, as the sequence went from the passenger seating area, to the cockpit and, finally, to inside a briefcase, which jettisoned out of the chopper and into a backyard pool. Suffice to say, Yellow Jacket looked much more badass in the final sequence.

Hank Pym's Dark Side and His Past with SHIELD

 

While Ant-Man is very much Scott Lang's story, we do get to know Hank Pym as well, particularly his past as Ant-Man. Through flashbacks, we discover that Hank used to work for SHIELD as a secret agent, alongside his wife Janet van Dyne (aka The Wasp), during the Cold War in the '60s. We also learn that Hank is none too pleased with how SHIELD is running things these days, especially when it comes to the Avengers.

""He's pretty dismissive," Douglas said of Hank's disdain for superheroes. "Some of the things that they do -- Iron Man and stuff -- are kind of silly [to him], compared to what's going on in the real world."

Old Man Hank?

 

Old Man Hank?

Added Feige, "He doesn't have a great experience with the people that he thinks are running things today. [Howard Stark] in particular he had a not-great encounter with in the past. And that's why he hung it up [the Ant-Man suit]. That's why he put it in a secure vault for decades and decades."

At ILM, we were shown the first eight minutes of the movie, the cold open of which was a flashback scene featuring a young Hank (de-aged with CGI), an older Peggy Carter (aged up with make-up) and, yes, Howard Stark (this time played by Iron Man 2's John Slattery). Here, we got a real sense of the tension between Hank and SHIELD, and his obstinate past with them. Without giving too much away, Hank is there to tender his resignation with the organization after a falling out over the Pym Particle. This is also when we first learn about Janet's untimely demise, which elicits a, er... appropriate reaction from Hank.

 

[Hank] has lost his wife in this, and it's what in many ways caused him to separate from SHIELD and become a bit of a recluse now.

However, Feige did confirm that we will see Janet in action in this -- though, as expected, the movie won't be addressing the couple's infamous domestic abuse storyline in the comics, at least not directly. "We hint at a temper in a way that people who know the stories might go, 'Oh, perhaps that's a bit of [Hank's] character,' but not in a way that would ever indicate [he beat his wife]," Feige said. "He has lost his wife in this, and it's what in many ways caused him to separate from SHIELD and become a bit of a recluse now. But we do see a bit of that temper, we hear a bit about it."

Douglas agreed, "There is a dark side to Hank. He has a military background, besides his science abilities. He wants to make the world a better place, but in doing so I think he realizes just how dark it is. So he sees that. He picked this guy Darren as his protege, early on, for this company, just like he picked Scott for this particular job. So just as there's a bit of thievery in Pym in terms of how he picked Scott, there's a darkness also that makes him understand where someone like Darren can go -- and where he is going to go. He now feels guilty for developing this and seeing how it could be used in a negative fashion."

 

Comics History 101: Who Is Ant-Man?

05:10

 

  

 

Big and Small

 

Of course, one of the key ingredients of Ant-Man is his ability to change his size. To accomplish this, the production team put together a whole macrophotography set, specifically to create plates and templates for all of Scott's micro-action. Here, we got a glimpse at some of the different "locations," which included a bathtub, an ATM, a dinner table, computer servers and even the inside of a vacuum cleaner!

"I was really adamant about it [being] tactile," Reed said of the minuscule special effects. "It's got to be real, and we have to figure out ways to be able to move around in these environments.

Presto change-o!

 

Presto change-o!

"The macrophotography is crucial, because we're using these Frazier lenses and these small, skater-cam things where you're able to get into these places. Then, we're doing this digital tiling of real surfaces. So the lighting, there were a lot of discussions about how, when you're shrunk, what's the light-play like? All these discussions of how light and sound and movement change. It was important to discuss that endlessly... Scale has to be figured out for every shot and angle. That's fun, but it's an insane amount of calculation."

In other words, don't sweat the idea of Ant-Man standing in front of a giant telephone or pencil on set. This is real-deal, authentic downsizing we're talking about here. And the proof was in the pudding at ILM, where we got to see Scott's first test-run with the suit. Here, the microscopic hero hopped his way through several levels of an apartment building, encountering shower drains, dancing feet, a predatory mouse and -- you guessed it -- the inside of that pesky vacuum cleaner. And it all looked great, thanks to photo-realistic environments.

"That was something I actually had the chance to talk to [Ant-Man co-creator] Stan Lee about, when he was doing the comics version," Reed revealed to us in the screening room. "He was saying that he always had to ride hard on all the artists about keeping Ant-Man small in the frame and always putting objects in the frame as points of reference for size, and also trying to get that perspective correct -- when you're low and you're doing these overs of tiny Ant-Man and some guy's about to stomp him with his show. All those things that were issues in the comics really came to life in the movie."

The Ants of Ant-Man

Speaking of superpowers and special abilities, what would Ant-Man be without his trusty ants? "You're going to see more ants than you're probably going to want to see," Feige joked.

You're going to see more ants than you're probably going to want to see.

"I mean, the shrinking thing is one thing, and kind of the most obvious Ant-Man power," Reed said, "but the controlling of the ants is the weirder power and the one I'm more into, in a weird way. With that you have the freedom to create these situations and this army of ants and see how something so small can be mobilized as an actually formidable thing."

While Reed said they used actual ants as reference and for macro-lighting purposes, all of the ants on screen will be CGI. The trick was figuring out how to make them look friendly without resorting to Pixar levels of cuteness.

Do you want ants? Because that's how you get ants!

Do you want ants? Because that's how you get ants!

"A lot of the ants have personalities, and a lot of the ants become characters," Feige said, "hopefully in a photo-real but slightly elevated way. So there's a flying ant that Scott befriends and scares the hell out of him... And there are so many different kinds of ant species, and we're going to see a good half-dozen or dozen of them in this film. I hope in a way that you're sort of cheering for them and upset if one or two or three get blown away by the bad guy."

But it's not just Darren, Hank and Scott who interact with the ants. "I have the best ant scene in the film, and you can quote me on it!" Lilly teased.

Choo Choo, Motherf***er!

Perhaps one of the most talked-about moments from the Ant-Man trailer has been the train-collision shot from Ant-Man and Yellow Jacket's "climactic" battle. (See image below.)

ant-man train

What fans may not realize -- MINOR SPOILERS here -- is that that scene is actually the finale of the movie!

As Feige revealed to us, "The entire finale of this film takes place in a little girl's bedroom, in a way that I hope is going to be very unique... Everything you've seen up to this point in the movie -- with what the Yellow Jacket can do; with what the Ant-Man suit can do; what the Pym Particles can do, both to shrink things and to enlarge things -- comes to a culmination in this little girl's room, in a way that I hope, I think, is going to make it one of the most unique finales we've ever had."

 

One More Thing...

 

Before we left our edit bay visit at ILM, Reed had one last clip to show us -- one that we can't quite talk about yet and, frankly, we wouldn't want to spoil for you. (Although we'll be sure to share the director's thoughts on the sequence after the movie is out.) That said, expect a few big surprises in Ant-Man that hint at the character's future ties with the MCU. After all, Marvel does have a seat saved for Scott Lang in Captain America: Civil War... IGN Logo

 

Some interesting stuff in there

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So My Mom and 2 sisters got to see the 6 minute preview of Ant-man in the converted Bug's Life Theater(they have the Ant-Man suit there!) pretty sure its the imax preview. They said they enjoyed it, and it was funny(though my Sis also said it was a little weird, but funny) 

 

We got some interesting interviews on Ant-Man(I've seen this split up over places, but IGN had it all together. Some of it could be considered semi-spoilery, so I'll put it in spoilers.

http://www.ign.com/articles/2015/06/22/ant-man-set-and-edit-bay-visit-making-marvels-underdog-movie

 

Some interesting stuff in there

Yeah I read up on some of these and then some, if they can execute this right it might end up making my list of favorite Superhero movies.

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To be fair (especially for those not in the loop about the whole Sony VS Marvel thing) it does look really, really, really silly to reboot Spidey yet again. And for those not in the loop then it also looks like it's for literally no reason, since the ASM movies are still in very recent memory and even if the second one wasn't really well received that's hardly a reason to start over again immediately.

 

And that issue's right beside the MCU's general issues with representation and diversity, which is very noticeable when compared to Marvel's comics in recent times, which are generally doing well in those areas.

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To be fair (especially for those not in the loop about the whole Sony VS Marvel thing) it does look really, really, really silly to reboot Spidey yet again. And for those not in the loop then it also looks like it's for literally no reason, since the ASM movies are still in very recent memory and even if the second one wasn't really well received that's hardly a reason to start over again immediately.

 

And that issue's right beside the MCU's general issues with representation and diversity, which is very noticeable when compared to Marvel's comics in recent times, which are generally doing well in those areas.

 

I think that that's a weird thing to complain about. Not the lack of movies starring black (or other minorites) superheroes; that I can understand. But hopefully, with the upcoming Black Panther and the Luke Cage series (which, by the way, I'm very hyped about) the road to other characters like those will be fully paved. Especially since we're not going to have a movie starring the Falcon anytime soon (unless they decide to do like the comics once Chris Evans stops being Captain America; that would work too).

 

But, no matter  how you look at it, for the general public, the spectators worldwide, Spider-Man is Peter Parker. Of course he was going to be played by a white guy. Now, if they wanted Miles Morales, that would have been another thing altogether.

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I think that that's a weird thing to complain about. Not the lack of movies starring black (or other minorites) superheroes; that I can understand. But hopefully, with the upcoming Black Panther and the Luke Cage series (which, by the way, I'm very hyped about) the road to other characters like those will be fully paved. Especially since we're not going to have a movie starring the Falcon anytime soon (unless they decide to do like the comics once Chris Evans stops being Captain America; that would work too).

 

But, no matter  how you look at it, for the general public, the spectators worldwide, Spider-Man is Peter Parker. Of course he was going to be played by a white guy. Now, if they wanted Miles Morales, that would have been another thing altogether.

From what I've seen they were hoping for Miles. I actually disagree with that to an extent, only because I feel like Miles is very very different from Peter. Yeah they're both super smart and ended up in similar situations, but Miles has a very different attitude and reacts to things very differently, not to mention different has some unique powers, etc, and that contrast is really interesting. Having Peter first is a good idea to set everything up, and then Miles shows up eventually to either replace him or also be Spider-Man (if the comics can have two Hawkeyes, I don't see why not)--that's what I've personally been hoping for, and it could realistically happen I think.

 

Bottom line: I'm not really bothered by the casting either, but I can understand why people are, so I'm just confused by the people who are so mad at them for being...mad.

 

We all knew it was gonna happen, but it's cool to see it's 100% confirmed.

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