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Detective Shadzter

A Catalog That Believes Reality Can Sell Clothes Better Than Photoshop

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Always great to see a company setting a positive example for women and men in terms of what beauty and self-esteem is...as well as just plain ol' proper anatomy. Really, some of the airbrushed photos you can find out there make people look like aborted giraffe/human hybrids. D8

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Photoshop or not, they look just fine even comparing them to the beautiful/hot/sexy/thisishowyouneedtolook models. Those Abercrombie & Bitch models are all smoke & mirrors anyways, I remember feeling inadequate because I didn't look like them when in reality they don't exist.

...Is that Flo from progressive in the bottom picture?

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The women are still airbrushed by the way, it's a bit obvious, lack of actual skin texture and no creases.

Oh and this book is exclusively available to the press, I highly doubt they'll actually use them.

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The women are still airbrushed by the way, it's a bit obvious, lack of actual skin texture and no creases.

Oh and this book is exclusively available to the press, I highly doubt they'll actually use them.

 

You sure that isn't the lighting? Seems that that would effect the look of the skin.

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That suit that guy is wearing kicks all kinds of ass. Its color fits my style of blue perfectly.

 

Everyone in those photos look wonderful though. It does make you see that everyday people make the apparel stand out a lot more.

Edited by TheChaosBlue

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I saw this a while ago, this is really great. I also think it's wonderful for them to include disabled people in their advertising. Although I doubt this kind of thing will ever even approach mainstream, I hope that other companies can follow in its wake.

 

That right-hand girl in the very first pic is like one of my dream girls uwwahh

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I applaud the efforts made by Debenhams to reform mass advertising. It goes to show that people don't need to make altercations to themselves (photoshop or otherwise) to look great.

 

Case in point, the women are still fap worthy, I'll say that much.

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Not to be a Debbie Downer, but other than the handicapped people (which honestly seem like a transparent publicity stunt for their inclusion, because I'm a cynical asshole like that) and the lady in the first pic on the right, I really don't see that much that wouldn't be allowed in a "regular" fashion spread; because I'm (at least skimming through the pics) not seeing anything "wrong" with them in that sense. Like the black lady with the short hair, the older guy with her and the lady in the last pic seem like they would already be in a JC Penney's catalog without any fuss.

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While it's cool because this is not the norm in fashion, these are still beautiful people judging from faces and all. I appreciate the simplicity of the shots though, they are wearing the clothes simply as is. I think skinny is being accepted as less normal, especially as most people outside the fashion world recognize that industry's obsession with thin models already. It's just the creation of a new norm. Some people make the mistake that just because a model is plus sized or whatever that it is any less objectifying of the girl, I disagree. I mean I know a handful of guys who would be like "Damn I would jump in that ass" to the thick girl up top, and maybe she was selected for the massive, I dunno, boobs popping out of the summer wear thing she's got on, just sayin'. Not like these people are exactly fat either. I'm not trying to be a dick about it, because this is less about the size of the people and more about the untouched photo work which is nice and honest, but you can totally objectify a big girl the way the skinnier types get in magazines and sell that and sell it and sell it in the name of "real beauty" or "real women have curves" or this word "natural". I just hate advertisement. I also kinda resent the suggestion that men have to be taught via this type of media that real girls are not stick thin. Some of them are, really. And girls are impressionable more so when it comes to this. Start eating, girls. But seriously you can objectify a big girl too. Where my chubbies at. Am I making my point the wrong way?

Edited by American Psycho

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Not to be a Debbie Downer, but other than the handicapped people (which honestly seem like a transparent publicity stunt for their inclusion, because I'm a cynical asshole like that) and the lady in the first pic on the right, I really don't see that much that wouldn't be allowed in a "regular" fashion spread; because I'm (at least skimming through the pics) not seeing anything "wrong" with them in that sense. Like the black lady with the short hair, the older guy with her and the lady in the last pic seem like they would already be in a JC Penney's catalog without any fuss.

 

Yeah, this is pretty much what i thought too. The inclusion of handicapped models screams publicity stunt to me, plus everyone's still clearly photoshopped too.

That said, it's definitly a step in the right direction and, as has been sid before, something that i can't beleive is already the norm.

 

This could still be taken further though, actually dropping the photoshop seems like the logical next step then we can move on to using models that look like regular human beings instead of jaw droppingly beautiful people who just happen to be a bit chunky or missing a limb.

 

105004.jpg

Put folk like Tim Martin, regular, slightly podgy, bit ugly people...like Tim Martin, in catalogues and then we'll talk smile.png

 

wetherspoon_1236831c.jpg

...cyor

Edited by Graf Orlok

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Here's my response to the cynicism here. I can see what you're saying, but even if that is a publicity stunt, I'd argue that the end result - handicapped people getting better representation in advertising - matters a lot more than the advertiser's motive, ulterior or otherwise.

 

A good deed done purely in the name of self-gain and personal recognition still has positive effects, regardless of motive. So I'm not ready to write this off as useless, even if that was the driving factor (though I'm not saying it is).

Edited by Dr. Mechano

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Not photoshopping people is something I can get behind; it's always been utterly ridiculous to me. They still pick attractive people though, because they're trying to sell a product. I'm not interested in the advertising side, because advertising can fuck off, but keeping away from photoshop when showing photographs of people in magazines and newspapers would be excellent. Instead of, you know, contributing to the misery and unrealistic expectations of an image-conscious public.

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Not to be a Debbie Downer, but other than the handicapped people (which honestly seem like a transparent publicity stunt for their inclusion, because I'm a cynical asshole like that) and the lady in the first pic on the right, I really don't see that much that wouldn't be allowed in a "regular" fashion spread; because I'm (at least skimming through the pics) not seeing anything "wrong" with them in that sense. Like the black lady with the short hair, the older guy with her and the lady in the last pic seem like they would already be in a JC Penney's catalog without any fuss.

 

I'm not quite sure how you "win" here though.  Yes they have models that barely scrape "minority" status but, I'm quite sure what would be better.  More minorities?  Less minorities?

 

Also not to put you on the spot but I am 99% certain the lady in the last pic is the same lady as the one on the right of the first pic too.  Funny how it's "normal" for plus sized models to wear dresses but not bikinis isn't it?  You'd almost think they were saying something.

Edited by JezMM

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Good for them! I hope this sets a trend and others will follow suit. Unfortunately, that's going to be easier said than done due to the fashion industry loving to play on people's body image.

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Debenhams becomes first to use size 16 mannequins

ad_119797246.jpg?w=650&h=432&crop=1#038;

Debenhams has become the country’s first mainstream high street retailer to adopt size 16 mannequins in an effort to better represent real women.

The new larger dummies will stand alongside size ten frames to reflect the average size of a British woman, which has grown from a 12 to a 16 in just over a decade.

Most high street retailers, such as Topshop and Miss Selfridge use size ten mannequins; Dorothy Perkins and Wallis go for a size ten-12.

After a pilot with size 16 mannequins in 2010, Debenhams decided to produce the larger dummies use them in stores across the country.

Ed Watson, a director of Debenhams said: ‘We’ve developed our own range of size 16 mannequins to sit alongside our usual size ten dummies. We felt it was important to better represent what real women actually look like when advertising our clothes.’

The new mannequins will be unveiled today in its Oxford Street store and will be rolled out across the country over the next few months.

Earlier this year Debenhams promised to stop using airbrushed models in its product shots and told rivals they had a ‘moral obligation’ to stop airbrushing.

http://metro.co.uk/2013/11/06/debenhams-becomes-first-to-use-size-16-mannequins-4175313/?ITO=facebook

 

Keep it up, Debenhams biggrin.png

The women are still airbrushed by the way, it's a bit obvious, lack of actual skin texture and no creases.

Oh and this book is exclusively available to the press, I highly doubt they'll actually use them.

The new article quoted in this post says they don't use airbrushed models any more. I think it's just the lighting.

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I know you're probably joking but do guys even look at mannequins?  When I'm buying new jeans I just pick up a pair, check that it doesn't have a stupid button fly, compare the label to the ones I'm wearing at the time, and when the numbers match I head to the checkout.

 

I imagine the kind of people who appreciate male mannequins as a reference point for clothes shopping are probably metrosexual enough to not allow themselves to get a beer belly.  8B

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I know you're probably joking but do guys even look at mannequins?  When I'm buying new jeans I just pick up a pair, check that it doesn't have a stupid button fly, compare the label to the ones I'm wearing at the time, and when the numbers match I head to the checkout.

 

I imagine the kind of people who appreciate male mannequins as a reference point for clothes shopping are probably metrosexual enough to not allow themselves to get a beer belly.  8B

Aha yeah I was only joking. Interesting enough though I do actually look at mannequins even if only to see what kind of clothes actually go together as I'm somewhat useless at that.

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