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Sonic Live Action Movie Thread (Read OP for topic rules) "Trailer 2 on Page 482)

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On 4/8/2020 at 10:02 PM, CaptainRobo said:

So, when do you guys think we can expect the sequel to be released? I know they can't start production on the sequel now because of the pandemic. Maybe we can expect it to be released in 2022 or 2023?

I imagine 2022 they will attempt for especially because of Eggman's line at the end for "I'll be back by Christmas" would be telling that this time they will want the sequel to be able to meet the holidays this time on schedule.

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10 hours ago, Operationgamer17 said:

This was an interesting point from the interview:

 

Quote

 

I particularly loved the post-credits scene of this movie. How did that come about and how might it feed into a potential sequel?

There are so many characters in the Sonic universe and fans were asking about a lot of them throughout the whole process of the film. It was planned very early on that we really wanted to allude to and tease some of these other characters that fans love, just to say: “Hey guys, we love these characters and we know you love them. We’re gonna get to them.”

We wanted to just acknowledge how popular they are and give fans some hope that they’re coming. If we get the opportunity to tell more stories, we absolutely have a place in the movie world for some of these characters that fans know and love.

And is that sequel coming? Are fans going to get it?

Nothing official, unfortunately, but nothing would make me happier than getting an opportunity to tell more stories with these characters. So, fingers crossed.

 

While nothing is ready yet, he definitely seems more optimistic about the chances of a sequel than most directors are with these kind of movies. I remember after the Warcraft movie premiered, the director definitely didn't seem very optimistic about that one's chances for a sequel.

 

2 hours ago, SonicLegends said:

I imagine 2022 they will attempt for especially because of Eggman's line at the end for "I'll be back by Christmas" would be telling that this time they will want the sequel to be able to meet the holidays this time on schedule.

I imagine we'll also be more priivy to the actual development cycle of the movie when it finally comes up. At least we can expect SEGA to coordinate more with Paramount on giving us stuff like previews, and coinciding that with their events and such.

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Full Interview from the Yahoo UK interview

Spoiler

Yahoo Movies UK: With such a big project that has such a passionate fan base, is there any relief that it’s done, it’s out there and people like it?

Jeff Fowler: Oh my gosh, you have no idea. It’s the biggest relief. Any project is gonna have a rollercoaster of emotions, but this particular one certainly went on quite a wild ride. So to have the story end in such a positive way is pretty amazing.

Absolutely! You’ve got people saying that this is the movie that will break the curse of video game movies. Was there any fear about taking the project on given that video game movies traditionally don’t do well?

I certainly did not spend too much time dwelling on it. Movies, whether they’re based on a video game or a comic book or a short story or a novel, they’re all very challenging undertakings. The last thing you want to do is come up with more reasons why it’s going to be a tall mountain to climb.

Certainly, I was aware of it though. You want to look at video game movies that came before and maybe say “why didn’t they succeed?” so you can do a post mortem that then you can hopefully learn from and apply to whatever film you’re trying to make.

Even before you got going with the project, it stalled over at Sony. Was there ever a time when you wrote this off and thought you weren’t going to be able to make it?

It’s important to stay positive and stay optimistic. When you enter this world of movie making and development, you’ve really got to be in it for the long haul. Behind every movie that’s a huge success is a story of just how long it took to get it made. It really does need to be a labour of love and you need to just believe that all of this work you’re doing will some day see the light of day and have a real shot at getting out there.

I wanted to ask about Jim Carrey who, for me, is the biggest delight of the film. Was it difficult to get him involved, or was he up for it from the start?

We had a really great first meeting. He was filming the first season of Kidding and I went and met with him on the Sony lot. As I was telling him about what our goal was with the film, I could see that little twinkle in his eye. All of the opportunity involved with playing a character like Robotnik — a villain with an IQ of 300 — I think was very new and exciting territory for him.

I think you can see that with his performance. He really just went all-in and had so many great ideas about how to develop the character and make it something that audiences will really love.

It’s really interesting for him. On the one hand, he’s playing a dark, villainous role but, on the other, it feels like a classic Jim Carrey performance. It feels like he’s flexing muscles he hasn’t used for years.

Yes, mainly face muscles! It’s incredible what he can do with his expressions.

Even while we were filming, just the mood and the vibe. There was a giddiness on set at just seeing what he was doing. There was so much excitement for where he was going with it and I feel very fortunate that he chose this character and this movie to flex some of those muscles.

We’ve alluded to some of the troubles this movie had. How big a setback was it when the first trailer came out and the reaction was what it was?

It was definitely a challenge. On the positive side, everyone was really excited about the movie and the story we were telling. So we just sort of compartmentalised the design into something that we needed to put some more work into.

Fortunately, it wasn’t like we were reworking the character in the story. We were literally just giving him a make-over. That actually made it very manageable. It was certainly very far from ideal, but it felt like a problem we could solve. We had a movie that we were all very excited about and that made the pain of that a little less.

When the movie came out, were you braced for another backlash or were you confident that it would get the positive reaction it ultimately did?

There will never be a version of anything where I have some kind of full confidence. You do your best and you hope that everyone will respond in a positive way and love it as much as you do. But you just never know. I certainly was optimistic, but I’d be lying if I said there wasn’t always some little bit of anxiety that comes with not knowing how people are going to react.

But on the flipside, it also comes with such tremendous euphoria and relief when it does go the way you hoped, like it did with this. I wouldn’t trade any of it for anything.

And what was your reaction when the response and the numbers started to come in and it became clear you had a success on your hands?

Just relief. So many people work so hard on movies. Going all the way back to the writing, the storyboarding, the filming, the post-production, the visual effects, the sound. There’s just so many aspects of this that require the talents and the efforts of so many people. So to be able to celebrate the work and for everyone to feel like they had a hand in something that was embraced the way it was was such a great feeling.

I particularly loved the post-credits scene of this movie. How did that come about and how might it feed into a potential sequel?

There are so many characters in the Sonic universe and fans were asking about a lot of them throughout the whole process of the film. It was planned very early on that we really wanted to allude to and tease some of these other characters that fans love, just to say: “Hey guys, we love these characters and we know you love them. We’re gonna get to them.”

We wanted to just acknowledge how popular they are and give fans some hope that they’re coming. If we get the opportunity to tell more stories, we absolutely have a place in the movie world for some of these characters that fans know and love.

And is that sequel coming? Are fans going to get it?

Nothing official, unfortunately, but nothing would make me happier than getting an opportunity to tell more stories with these characters. So, fingers crossed.

Yes, my fingers are crossed too!

Also, found another one from Syfy.:

Spoiler

“It's funny how much actually is in the movie, in terms of what the guys would pitch from time to time,” Fowler explains. “A perfect example of that is the mobile lab and Robotnik's big dance sequence; that was never scripted like that. Jim came in with the idea and also pitched The Poppy Family song, "Where Evil Grows," which is just so offbeat and weird, but also kind of perfect.”

Fowler does reveal there were alternate versions of Sonic and Longclaw’s back story from the film's opening that was reworked during production. In the home video release, there’s a rough animatic of one alternate version. 

“And there's, obviously, some really great outtakes and bloopers,” Fowler continues. “There's one deleted scene between James Marsden (Tom) and Sonic where they're having a little conversation on the couch at Rachel's (Natasha Rothwell) house, and it's a really nice scene. It's basically Sonic trying to apologize for getting so mad on the highway, and being upset with Tom about leaving town. But we actually repurposed a lot of that, and put it on the Transamerica rooftop in that "goodbye" scene. We realized those two scenes were very close to each other, and very similar in tone. And so it felt redundant to have a heart-to-heart on the couch, and then to have the false goodbye on the top of the Transamerica building. We cut the couch scene, and then we took the best lines, and repurposed them into the Transamerica side of it.”

We also asked with some distance from the whole VFX debacle surrounding the original, and then changed, design for Sonic, how that changed him as a filmmaker when it comes to VFX. Fowler says he wishes the whole experience metaphorically unlocked a magical VFX wisdom achievement for him, but he knows that’s not how it works. 

“The sad reality is that just when you think you've got one thing figured out, something else will come along,” he says of production snafus in general. “I think what worked for Sonic, and with this character, and with this fan base, could become not necessarily directly applicable the next time out because of some other reason. I appreciate having been through the whole experience with it, and it’s just a reminder of how important the fans are. But it's such a balance. You don't want to be polling the fan base and just [asking], ‘What do you want from a movie?’ Because that just turns into Mad Libs. There's just no way for you to come out with one cohesive thing.”

Yet, Fowler does admit that attending the Sonic press tour and subsequent fan screenings really clarified for him some elements that need to be part of a sequel if it happens. 

In particular, more of Sonic’s videogame BFF, Tails. “Of all the screenings that I would pop in for, seeing people's reaction to Tails showing up at the end…nothing could have prepared me!” he admits with some awe. “To see people respond and having these kids just shout at the screen, and just yell their little brains out. I just never got sick of it. I just loved it. And the idea that we made this whole movie, and we didn't have a single scene of Sonic and Tails together. It's incredible, but it also is so exciting [for a sequel].”

He also says the deeper evolution of Carrey’s Dr. Robotnik would be a part of the continuing story. “Jim was just very smart about all of that,” Fowler says of the character’s slow progression towards the bulbous, madman fans know from the game. “We would always have the conversation while we were filming about where we were at in the timeline, and how to modulate the performance accordingly. Because you want to have a little fun with him with that spiraling off into madness. And understand that the reason he's on some alien planet, and he's bald, and he has a crazy mustache, is because all the stress of trying to capture this hedgehog, literally just unraveled him.”

With the standstill of the whole globe due to the pandemic, and Hollywood production at a virtual standstill, Fowler confirms there has been no official Sonic sequel greenlight yet from Paramount. 

“Fingers crossed,” he says of that happening in the near future. “If we're fortunate enough to do another movie, that we can finally get [Sonic and Tails] together and have some real fun, and really get to some of what is the next level of what people love about this world and these characters. Right now, it's just great that people are enjoying the movie and are now having an opportunity to watch it at home despite all this Corona craziness. That's enough for me. It's great that it's out there, and that people are enjoying it.”

 I guess the reason why a sequel haven't been greenlighted yet because Paramount is still waiting for the movie to be out in Japan and China. I talk about that on the last post. Although, the sequel may not have been greenlighted yet, I think they could start taking ideas to put in the sequel. I hear the Rock is in talks to be in the next one according to Neal McDonough back in February. 

Spoiler

"I'm looking forward to part two. Literally, part two, I've already heard rumblings that The Rock is going to be [in it]. The Rock is in part two of everything, by the way."

 

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OK so I've been a nerd. Been trying to find what Crush 40 songs Robotnik was listening to. Now it may look like 7 tracks but the last 3 are the same as the first 3. So 4 tracks.

 

Track 1 is about 3:52. I Am (All of Me) is about that length. Track 2 is 3:25 which is darn close to Free. Track 3 is 4:05, the closest I found to that is With Me at 3:57. Track 4 is 2:50, almost perfectly Sonic Boom. Then its just track 1-3 again. 

Course that's me just approximating, just thought it was fun.

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I bet the budget for the sequel will be higher. With all of the money that they got from the box office, it's highly likely it will be higher. I assume that the movie was short and took very long time to make because of the small budget that they have.

BTW, found this.:

 

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James Marsden on what he would like to see in the sequel.:

"Well I think we'd do a lot more of the same, but we would probably hopefully throw even more set pieces in there and more action sequences. I think we'd hopefully introduce some new characters, some beloved characters from the video game. If you stayed through the credits, you saw a little introduction to Tails. Hoping we'd see Tails come in. You know, who knows? The good thing is, is that hopefully when we come back to earth after this thing and we're still making movies, that Paramount will really fire it up again, and we'll just have double the fun."

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On 4/11/2020 at 11:54 PM, CaptainRobo said:

I bet the budget for the sequel will be higher. With all of the money that they got from the box office, it's highly likely it will be higher. I assume that the movie was short and took very long time to make because of the small budget that they have.

BTW, found this.:

 

I also think that there will be more action sequences in the sequel, now that they have a much bigger budget. It would be nice if most of the action sequences take place in Sonic's world.

 

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Quote

 

Apple

  • 1. Trolls World Tour
  • 2. The Call of the Wild
  • 3. 1917
  • 4. Birds of Prey
  • 5. Little Women
  • 6. Dolittle
  • 7. Knives Out
  • 8. Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker
  • 9. Jumanji: The Next Level
  • 10. Sonic the Hedgehog

 

Amazon

  • 1. Trolls World Tour
  • 2. Sonic the Hedgehog
  • 3. Jumanji; The Next Level
  • 4. Bloodshot
  • 5. Bad Boys for Life
  • 6. Knives Out
  • 7. The Greatest Showman
  • 8. Little Women
  • 9. Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker
  • 10. The Gentlemen

 

 

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I wonder what kind of plot line they will have for Tails?  It would be interesting to see if Tails was purposely keeping his twin tails a secret from anyone he met along the way since he was probably still traumatized by the bullying he got because of his tails.

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You know, I have t cool idea how to reintroduce  Knuckles:

He starts as this Boom/Hesse/Modern big idiot Knuckles. He's cheerful, optimistic and buys every single word Eggman tells him.

And then.... he gets betrayed. He gets agry serious, and while Sonic helps him, there is some parrarels to Eggman "helping", so Knuckes remains distrustful. That would be perfect marriage of goody and serious Knuckles..... of course it would better if Knuckles was last of his kind, and not part of very aggressive echidna tribe.

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Found a interview with the writers.:

Spoiler

DF:  So to begin, how did you first get into screenwriting?

JM: I was one of those people who always wanted to do it. I was making movies on our home video camera when I was a kid. Pat and I met in eighth grade and I like to feel that I slowly started poisoning his mind towards becoming a writer as well.

PC: Yeah, Josh was a corrupting influence on me. I had always loved stories, reading, and movies. When I met Josh, he fully planned on making a career out of it, which I had never even really thought about it as though that were even remotely possible, but he was 100% sure and I was like, “Oh, well maybe”.

JM: Then we really tried to become friends. I guess where we got our kind of like boot camp training ground was in Minneapolis, Minnesota. We’re both from the same suburb in Minneapolis and we both wound up on this late-night live comedy show. There was only cable access, right? So really only the people in our suburb could watch it, but we did that every Friday all throughout high school.

PC: And we had to put it in our 10,000 hours.

DF: It’s really great seeing that you two grew up together and that you’re still working together. Now you’ve both got this big role in writing the Sonic film, which was a massive success. A lot of people have seen it. How did you get the opportunity to write the film?

JM: The short version is just that we had what’s called a general meeting with the producers of Sonic when they were still in the script phase.

PC:  Toby Ascher, specifically.

JM: At the time, they already had writers and we kind of just made some joke about how if they were ever looking for new writers, they should give us a call and that actually ended up happening. But it wasn’t like they just offered us a job. They offered it to a lot of different writers. You kind of have to compete to get the job. Not by writing, you just have endless meetings. It’s like a job interview.

PC: Somehow we were able to talk our way into it. Toby, Jeff Fowler, Tim Miller, and Neil Moritz decided to take a chance on us, which we are grateful for. We wanted to do everything we could to maximize on the opportunity and then make it a good movie.

DF: You definitely did because a lot of people like this film. Sonic is obviously a big character, he has a lot of history. Was there anything in particular that you took from the character’s past as inspiration when writing? Did you know the character before? What was your experience?

JM: I mean like a lot of kids from the 90s, we played a lot of the original Sega Genesis games.

PC: In particular, Sonic 2. Which I probably put more hours in than any other game ever.

Screenshot 2020-04-13 at 8.39.49 AM ‘Sonic the Hedgehog 2’ courtesy of SEGA

JM: We lost track of the character as we get older. It expanded into all of these different TV shows, comics, and newer games. So we were kind of coming at it from what we felt was the character in those very early games that didn’t even have much of a story. It was really all about capturing what we felt was the aesthetic spirit of the games and just what the characters seemed like on the cover art. A big factor we found was the idea that if you put your controller down and weren’t playing the game for too long, the character on screen would actually get impatient with you and start looking at his watch and tap his foot. We were like, “What type of character does that imply and how do you translate that kind of fun attitude”?

PC: Yeah, we were really trying to extrapolate based on those little bits of animation and what little story there was in the original games. Mostly just build a movie out of the feelings it gave us when we were twelve playing the game and trying to adapt that. The feeling more than the story, if that makes any sense.

DF: It totally does. There has been a lot of talk about the accuracy and definitely the feeling like you’re saying, that is definitely there. So well done on that!

JM: You never know how the movie is going to be received until it comes out. So we felt very happy that fans seemed to feel that we did get it right because of the fact that it’s not exactly super faithful. We can easily imagine that they are just pissed off that we didn’t do exactly what’s in the comics or later games.

PC: It’s funny that we are getting credit seemingly for being accurate to the games when they’re not in a literal sense, the movie’s not accurate to the game.

JM: It is accurate, accurate to the feeling.

DF: You had these meetings trying to become the writers and eventually you won the job. Did you get to work with the director, Jeff Fowler? Was there a collaboration in that or did he come after?

JM: We actually got hired at the exact same time and this was his first movie. In some ways, they were also taking a chance on him. I think that put us all on the same boat bonding wise. The funny thing is they hired us, but not for our initial pitch for the story. So we kind of all sat in a room together, usually just us and Jeff. Then Toby Ascher, who was working on several movies at once, would come over to the offices like once every three days and we just spent several weeks hashing out a story.

PC: It was a very close collaboration with Jeff. The three of us worked together quite a bit coming up with a story.

DF: You can tell that there is some sort of connection there because that feeling comes through. So with Sonic being available on VOD, what are your thoughts on people getting to see your film early due to what’s going on in the world?

JM: We feel lucky, even though ultimately whatever it’s full box office potential would have been, we’ll never know. But considering all the movies that came out weeks ago or are getting postponed till later in the year or even next year, we feel very fortunate that our movie at least had a bit of a chance to play on the big screen around the world and for people to see it that way. I’m still hoping that it will get to open in China and Japan, but who knows about that? I guess the short version is that we feel like we got our shot in the theater and for those who didn’t get a chance to see, we’re happy that they have a way to see it now while we’re all trapped at home.

PC: Yeah and parents with little kids running around are sharing it while trying to work from home. Hopefully, Sonic can do its part in distracting the kids and keeping everybody calm.

JM: We were told by our friends that after they saw the movie, their kids then ran around endlessly pretending to be Sonic. So I suppose there’s some danger to it as well because they exercise now more than ever.

PC: We’re glad that we got that theatrical release and that we were able to see it in a theater full of paying customers and soak up the experience. After having worked on this movie for years, that was a very good feeling. Just to see the crowd enjoying it and be able to be a part of that.

maxresdefault Tails as seen in ‘Sonic the Hedgehog’ courtesy of Paramount

DF: Talking about a spoilery bit, there’s a little tease at the end of the film with the character Tails. Was there a decision on your behalf to have him only appear briefly rather than come in as a full character? What was the idea behind showing him?

JM: Well very, very early on, like in versions of the movie that never even made it to script and some that I don’t even think ever made it to an outline – just in the blue sky phase we talked about versions where Tails was maybe a supporting character. Then it became clear that it’s one of those things, it’s a Pandora’s box. Once you start opening up the Sonic mythology, it becomes a very big movie very quickly. We decided to take some of the same approach the games did, wherein the original Sonic the Hedgehog is just Sonic and Robotnik and Tails doesn’t show up until Sonic 2. From the moment we decided he wasn’t going to be in the movie, he was always going to be in the sort of Nick Fury post-credits scene.

PC: That was in every single draft. What the scene was exactly changed a couple of times. The movie was always going to end with Tails showing up because it just felt like that’s what we would want to see.

JM: There were a lot of ideas that once we realized we couldn’t put it in the movie, we were kind of hunting the hypothetical sequel. I guess that was our way of letting the fans know, who maybe were sad as they didn’t get to see any of that stuff in the movie, that hey if the movie does well, maybe next time we can play in that sandbox!

DF: Talking about that, would you like to return for a sequel? It seems likely as it did really well. Are there any particular parts from Sonic lore that you would want to tackle?

PC: Yes, we would love to do a second one. As for what is going to go into that I think maybe it’s too early to say publicly. If we were at a bar and not doing this interview for public consumption – maybe we would give some hints!

JM: But as we kind of teed up before, we would like to dig into more of the Sonic lore.

PC: Yeah, obviously Tails, but maybe a little more characters as well!

DF: Are there any upcoming projects that you would like to promote and make our audience aware of?

JM: Right before the industry kind of started shutting down here, we sold a project to Universal Pictures called Violent Night that is currently under wraps. It is technically under wraps, but it’s a Christmas set R-rated action-thriller.

PC: With that and a nice dose of comedy built in. But that’s not going to be out for two years. You can still watch our show Golan the Insatiable on Hulu. If you’re a fan of demons, 12 Deadly Days was another show we did that’s on YouTube TV.

JM: I’ll also hype that I have a podcast called Best Movies Never Made. Pat was just a guest on the show!

PC: I’m not just a guest, I’m also a fan of it.

JM: Best Movies Never Made, every episode we talk about a different movie that almost got made but didn’t. The episodes that Pat was on, we were talking about all the versions of the Super Mario Bros. movie that didn’t get made leading up to the infamous Bob Hoskins one. It was a Mario vs. Sonic grudge match podcast!

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49 minutes ago, CaptainRobo said:

Found a interview with the writers.:

  Hide contents

DF:  So to begin, how did you first get into screenwriting?

JM: I was one of those people who always wanted to do it. I was making movies on our home video camera when I was a kid. Pat and I met in eighth grade and I like to feel that I slowly started poisoning his mind towards becoming a writer as well.

PC: Yeah, Josh was a corrupting influence on me. I had always loved stories, reading, and movies. When I met Josh, he fully planned on making a career out of it, which I had never even really thought about it as though that were even remotely possible, but he was 100% sure and I was like, “Oh, well maybe”.

JM: Then we really tried to become friends. I guess where we got our kind of like boot camp training ground was in Minneapolis, Minnesota. We’re both from the same suburb in Minneapolis and we both wound up on this late-night live comedy show. There was only cable access, right? So really only the people in our suburb could watch it, but we did that every Friday all throughout high school.

PC: And we had to put it in our 10,000 hours.

DF: It’s really great seeing that you two grew up together and that you’re still working together. Now you’ve both got this big role in writing the Sonic film, which was a massive success. A lot of people have seen it. How did you get the opportunity to write the film?

JM: The short version is just that we had what’s called a general meeting with the producers of Sonic when they were still in the script phase.

PC:  Toby Ascher, specifically.

JM: At the time, they already had writers and we kind of just made some joke about how if they were ever looking for new writers, they should give us a call and that actually ended up happening. But it wasn’t like they just offered us a job. They offered it to a lot of different writers. You kind of have to compete to get the job. Not by writing, you just have endless meetings. It’s like a job interview.

PC: Somehow we were able to talk our way into it. Toby, Jeff Fowler, Tim Miller, and Neil Moritz decided to take a chance on us, which we are grateful for. We wanted to do everything we could to maximize on the opportunity and then make it a good movie.

DF: You definitely did because a lot of people like this film. Sonic is obviously a big character, he has a lot of history. Was there anything in particular that you took from the character’s past as inspiration when writing? Did you know the character before? What was your experience?

JM: I mean like a lot of kids from the 90s, we played a lot of the original Sega Genesis games.

PC: In particular, Sonic 2. Which I probably put more hours in than any other game ever.

Screenshot 2020-04-13 at 8.39.49 AM ‘Sonic the Hedgehog 2’ courtesy of SEGA

JM: We lost track of the character as we get older. It expanded into all of these different TV shows, comics, and newer games. So we were kind of coming at it from what we felt was the character in those very early games that didn’t even have much of a story. It was really all about capturing what we felt was the aesthetic spirit of the games and just what the characters seemed like on the cover art. A big factor we found was the idea that if you put your controller down and weren’t playing the game for too long, the character on screen would actually get impatient with you and start looking at his watch and tap his foot. We were like, “What type of character does that imply and how do you translate that kind of fun attitude”?

PC: Yeah, we were really trying to extrapolate based on those little bits of animation and what little story there was in the original games. Mostly just build a movie out of the feelings it gave us when we were twelve playing the game and trying to adapt that. The feeling more than the story, if that makes any sense.

DF: It totally does. There has been a lot of talk about the accuracy and definitely the feeling like you’re saying, that is definitely there. So well done on that!

JM: You never know how the movie is going to be received until it comes out. So we felt very happy that fans seemed to feel that we did get it right because of the fact that it’s not exactly super faithful. We can easily imagine that they are just pissed off that we didn’t do exactly what’s in the comics or later games.

PC: It’s funny that we are getting credit seemingly for being accurate to the games when they’re not in a literal sense, the movie’s not accurate to the game.

JM: It is accurate, accurate to the feeling.

DF: You had these meetings trying to become the writers and eventually you won the job. Did you get to work with the director, Jeff Fowler? Was there a collaboration in that or did he come after?

JM: We actually got hired at the exact same time and this was his first movie. In some ways, they were also taking a chance on him. I think that put us all on the same boat bonding wise. The funny thing is they hired us, but not for our initial pitch for the story. So we kind of all sat in a room together, usually just us and Jeff. Then Toby Ascher, who was working on several movies at once, would come over to the offices like once every three days and we just spent several weeks hashing out a story.

PC: It was a very close collaboration with Jeff. The three of us worked together quite a bit coming up with a story.

DF: You can tell that there is some sort of connection there because that feeling comes through. So with Sonic being available on VOD, what are your thoughts on people getting to see your film early due to what’s going on in the world?

JM: We feel lucky, even though ultimately whatever it’s full box office potential would have been, we’ll never know. But considering all the movies that came out weeks ago or are getting postponed till later in the year or even next year, we feel very fortunate that our movie at least had a bit of a chance to play on the big screen around the world and for people to see it that way. I’m still hoping that it will get to open in China and Japan, but who knows about that? I guess the short version is that we feel like we got our shot in the theater and for those who didn’t get a chance to see, we’re happy that they have a way to see it now while we’re all trapped at home.

PC: Yeah and parents with little kids running around are sharing it while trying to work from home. Hopefully, Sonic can do its part in distracting the kids and keeping everybody calm.

JM: We were told by our friends that after they saw the movie, their kids then ran around endlessly pretending to be Sonic. So I suppose there’s some danger to it as well because they exercise now more than ever.

PC: We’re glad that we got that theatrical release and that we were able to see it in a theater full of paying customers and soak up the experience. After having worked on this movie for years, that was a very good feeling. Just to see the crowd enjoying it and be able to be a part of that.

maxresdefault Tails as seen in ‘Sonic the Hedgehog’ courtesy of Paramount

DF: Talking about a spoilery bit, there’s a little tease at the end of the film with the character Tails. Was there a decision on your behalf to have him only appear briefly rather than come in as a full character? What was the idea behind showing him?

JM: Well very, very early on, like in versions of the movie that never even made it to script and some that I don’t even think ever made it to an outline – just in the blue sky phase we talked about versions where Tails was maybe a supporting character. Then it became clear that it’s one of those things, it’s a Pandora’s box. Once you start opening up the Sonic mythology, it becomes a very big movie very quickly. We decided to take some of the same approach the games did, wherein the original Sonic the Hedgehog is just Sonic and Robotnik and Tails doesn’t show up until Sonic 2. From the moment we decided he wasn’t going to be in the movie, he was always going to be in the sort of Nick Fury post-credits scene.

PC: That was in every single draft. What the scene was exactly changed a couple of times. The movie was always going to end with Tails showing up because it just felt like that’s what we would want to see.

JM: There were a lot of ideas that once we realized we couldn’t put it in the movie, we were kind of hunting the hypothetical sequel. I guess that was our way of letting the fans know, who maybe were sad as they didn’t get to see any of that stuff in the movie, that hey if the movie does well, maybe next time we can play in that sandbox!

DF: Talking about that, would you like to return for a sequel? It seems likely as it did really well. Are there any particular parts from Sonic lore that you would want to tackle?

PC: Yes, we would love to do a second one. As for what is going to go into that I think maybe it’s too early to say publicly. If we were at a bar and not doing this interview for public consumption – maybe we would give some hints!

JM: But as we kind of teed up before, we would like to dig into more of the Sonic lore.

PC: Yeah, obviously Tails, but maybe a little more characters as well!

DF: Are there any upcoming projects that you would like to promote and make our audience aware of?

JM: Right before the industry kind of started shutting down here, we sold a project to Universal Pictures called Violent Night that is currently under wraps. It is technically under wraps, but it’s a Christmas set R-rated action-thriller.

PC: With that and a nice dose of comedy built in. But that’s not going to be out for two years. You can still watch our show Golan the Insatiable on Hulu. If you’re a fan of demons, 12 Deadly Days was another show we did that’s on YouTube TV.

JM: I’ll also hype that I have a podcast called Best Movies Never Made. Pat was just a guest on the show!

PC: I’m not just a guest, I’m also a fan of it.

JM: Best Movies Never Made, every episode we talk about a different movie that almost got made but didn’t. The episodes that Pat was on, we were talking about all the versions of the Super Mario Bros. movie that didn’t get made leading up to the infamous Bob Hoskins one. It was a Mario vs. Sonic grudge match podcast!

Source

Did they seriously use a beta screenshot of the Sonic 2 title screen?

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3 hours ago, MetalSkulkBane said:

You know, I have t cool idea how to reintroduce  Knuckles:

He starts as this Boom/Hesse/Modern big idiot Knuckles. He's cheerful, optimistic and buys every single word Eggman tells him.

And then.... he gets betrayed. He gets agry serious, and while Sonic helps him, there is some parrarels to Eggman "helping", so Knuckes remains distrustful. That would be perfect marriage of goody and serious Knuckles..... of course it would better if Knuckles was last of his kind, and not part of very aggressive echidna tribe.

That could work, but I still think the rebellious outcast version works better. Then Robotnik could trick Knuckles into thinking that Sonic and Tails are actually assassins hired by his tribe to hunt him down or something but after a fight, the misunderstanding is cleared, the trio teams up and Team Sonic is born, with Knuckles finally gaining some more friends after lonely life in exile.

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On 4/19/2020 at 6:56 AM, Sonario said:

That could work, but I still think the rebellious outcast version works better. Then Robotnik could trick Knuckles into thinking that Sonic and Tails are actually assassins hired by his tribe to hunt him down or something but after a fight, the misunderstanding is cleared, the trio teams up and Team Sonic is born, with Knuckles finally gaining some more friends after lonely life in exile.

I prefer the more serious Knuckles from the early days rather than the goofy Knuckles we have now. I mean, I don't mind if Knuckles has a few funny moments in the film, but I found the serious version of him much more interesting.

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Was watching tangled today and I realised sueprficially that movie and this has similarities

 

a young one is forced to keep hidden because their adoptive guardian says people will be after their powers, only longclaw was sincere and goth was jsut self serving

 

they formally meet someone new who helps them on an adventure where they don’t even have to hide anymore, they even visit a bar

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I just saw the Sonic HISHE and I LOVED IT!  

Spoiler

I loved the Avengers style fight between Sonic and his friends and Dr. Robotnik and all the robotic clones of all the previous roles that Jim Carrey had played over the years.

 

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2 hours ago, CaptainRobo said:

 

Funny thing about that, I have some throwaway ideas for a dark Forces rewrite where Tails becomes the leader of the resistance and loses an eye trying to protect Sonic, having to wear an eyepatch for his adult design.

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