Jump to content
KHCast

FCC's policies being reversed by house. Internet privacy be gone!

Recommended Posts

Cleaning up my topic.

https://qz.com/945261/how-to-get-a-personal-vpn-and-why-you-need-one-now/

So essentially this is the gist. The house is reversing the FCC's ruling on internet protections and privacy that were set to go into effect this October. It was a staggering all red vote for yes verses a all blue no. Essentially, on top of the already invasion of privacy this is, it also opens potential threats due to practices made illegal by the FCC's proposal are now up for game. Service providers also are free from restrictions and limitations on what they could do with their customers information. It's a corporation benefiting centered law with no real gain for us, that treats the internet with no real respect.

Given who's doing the signing on this, the history so far on the administration backing this, the almost unanimous disapproval from anyone not republican, and who's been all for it, and said people's history and views on internet privacy, I'd say it's reasonable to be concerned and worried for what this means down the line. Services like Opera an VPN's much like in the past are good work arounds to keeping those corporations from seeing your info and selling it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great. This is a direct violation of one of our Constitutional rights: the right to privacy.

By the way, there are guests here with us. They're just too shy to speak up.

 

HELLO, NSA. AND YOU TOO, CIA.

HOW ARE YOU DOING TODAY?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Stardust said:

Constitutional rights: the right to privacy.

 

That's debatable. The problem is the constitution is not explicit enough to reasonably provide a "right to privacy" in the way it should, leaving enough room for people to argue whether we have any right to privacy at all.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, CleverSonicUsername said:

That's debatable. The problem is the constitution is not explicit enough to reasonably provide a "right to privacy" in the way it should, leaving enough room for people to argue whether we have any right to privacy at all.

 

 

 

It may be debatable, but it really shouldn't be. The constitution was never flawless. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love how the constitution is used by many, usually repubs, to keep certain policies since "even though they're vague, it can be implied that's what they meant", but anything they want gone they by the same token go "it's too vague to say for sure that's what they meant, so we're gonna infringe on that right/eliminate it"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Stardust said:

Great. This is a direct violation of one of our Constitutional rights: the right to privacy.

33 minutes ago, CleverSonicUsername said:

That's debatable. The problem is the constitution is not explicit enough to reasonably provide a "right to privacy" in the way it should, leaving enough room for people to argue whether we have any right to privacy at all.

10 minutes ago, KHCast said:

Love how the constitution is used by many, usually repubs, to keep certain policies since "even though they're vague, it can be implied that's what they meant", but anything they want gone they by the same token go "it's too vague to say for sure that's what they meant, so we're gonna infringe on that right/eliminate it"

So what does the US Constitution have to do with the government saying that private companies can sell information that you've already been giving them like they could already do?

 

 

 

I legitimately have to wonder where some of you people get this stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My point was in general, its a hypocrotical notion been applied for ages, "constitution is too vague", "its vague but can be interpreted to mean this" and secondly they're not selling to private only companies here? Anyone can buy the information. Hence why there are people raising money to purchase the republicans internet history once the bill is signed 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Hence why there are people raising money to purchase the republicans internet history once the bill is signed 

No. To be perfectly frank, people are raising money to purchase Republican's internet history because they have about as much understanding of what actually passed as you do when you made this thread. What was passed by Republican lawmakers was a law rescinding FCC regulations that restricted what ISPs can do with your personal information. Those regulations were set to go into effect at the end of this year, since they were established by the FCC all of 6 months ago. ISPs can already do what the law just passed will allow them to do, because the rules that said they can't hadn't actually begun; and how you came to the conclusion that the government was the ones selling your personal information I have no idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Tornado said:

So what does the US Constitution have to do with the government saying that private companies can sell information that you've already been giving them like they could already do?

It doesn't. As far as I'm concerned I was just pointing out that the presence of a constitutional right is flimsy, I'm not speaking about this specific issue with ISPs. To be fair I probably should have just bolded the "constitutional right to privacy" part to make that more clear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Senator Jeff Flake — a Republican representing Arizona — lead the effort to overturn the FCC’s privacy rules. He was already the most unpopular senator in the US. Now he may become the most unpopular senator in US history.

Instead of just blaming Flake, though, let’s remember that every single senator who voted in favor of overturning these privacy rules was a Republican. Every single Democrat and Independent senator voted against this CRA resolution. The final vote was 50–48, with two Republicans voting against the resolution, and another two choosing not to vote.

 

 

Quote

 

The CRA resolution passed yesterday in the House of Representatives, where 231 Republicans voted in favor of removing privacy protections against 189 Democrats who voted against it. (Again, not a single non-Republican voted to remove these privacy protections.)

All that’s left is for the Republican president to sign the resolution, which he most certainly will do.

So what kind of messed-up things can ISPs now legally do with our data?

According to the Electronic Frontier Foundation, there are at least five creepy things the FCC regulations would have made illegal. But thanks to the Senate, ISPs can now continue doing these things as much as they want, and it will probably be years before we can do anything to stop them.

  1. Sell your browsing history to basically any corporation or government that wants to buy it
  2. Hijack your searches and share them with third parties
  3. Monitor all your traffic by injecting their own malware-filled ads into the websites you visit
  4. Stuff undetectable, un-deletable tracking cookies into all of your non-encrypted traffic
  5. Pre-install software on phones that will monitor all traffic — even HTTPS traffic — before it gets encrypted. AT&T, Sprint, and T-Mobile have already done this with some Android phones.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And you're claim that those situations couldn't in fact happen and that those republicans that passed it didn't vote for that in specific is supported by?

 

Cause Jeff Flake was leading overturning the FCC's rules, and those are some of the illegal things that are now possible because of said overturning. 

 

Again, where's the benefit in this again for consumers?

 

edit: also funny how you linked to a Washington post article when you were mocking someone the other day for doing the same. And on top of that, the article is still shitting on the policy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I mean this whole thing is shitty and those regulations should have gone into effect, but data brokerage has been a thing for a very long time now, so the fact that it will continue to be a thing is really not much of a shock. If you don't like it, call your congressperson and tell them they let you down, then invest in a VPN.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not much of a shock, but broadening the fuckage is still a dick slap. It was already a crappy idea selling information without the consent of the people, upgrading it, is still crap and I won't ever understand moderates and republicans insesent defensiveness and inapathy regarding people's issue  with the notion. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, CleverSonicUsername said:

Technically you're giving your consent when you sign up for service.

Basically "get fucked and enjoy basic functions of this modern age" or "don't get fucked and have a tough time living in this age without it"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, KHCast said:

And you're claim that those situations couldn't in fact happen and that those republicans that passed it didn't vote for that in specific is supported by?

 

Cause Jeff Flake was leading overturning the FCC's rules, and those are some of the illegal things that are now possible 

...

 

 

Okay, I think I've tolerated this enough.

24 minutes ago, KHCast said:

Yeah, republicans and by extension or government had no responsibility for this and people are freaking out for nothing

Are you just fucking incapable of intellectual honesty when it comes to debating politics? Look what you wrote in the thread title:

US Govenrment now selling our browser history to ANYONE.

There isn't a single fucking part of that sentence you started this thread with that is true. That carried over to the sentences in the OP that you supported the title with. Most of the information in the link you posted to support the premise of your thread title is wrong. The US government isn't selling shit to anyone  ISPs are selling things, and there is no "now" involved since they've always been able to do that and could do before this law passed and have done that, because the regulations saying they couldn't hadn't gone into effect yet because the FCC didn't come up with them until October of last year. There was nothing illegal about the practice, has been nothing illegal about the practice, and wouldn't have been anything illegal about it for another 9 months. For over twenty years ISPs have been selling user information to companies, and the only reason the FCC decided to do anything about it last year was because telecom companies have started buying up Internet ISPs and made explicit their plans to monetize information that anyone who had ever bothered to read their ToS for Time Warner or Comcast knew could already be done.

 

And yet when I point out what Republican lawmakers actually did was not anything like what you insinuated in the thread title or OP, instead of admitting that you might be wrong you double down with the same strawman you've been using since Trump has been elected for pretty much everything; as if merely pointing out that the sky isn't falling everytime the GOP does anything counts as outright dismissal of all concerns. Do you think SSMB is enough if a left wing shoutbox that you can pretty much just make shit up and claim Republicans did it because it would sound to you like something they would do? Do you think I'm so far up the GOPs ass that when I question the honestly completely ridiculous things you try and pass off in these threads sometimes that I'm making things up? Or do you just not know any better before you post the first terrible internet article that you found to be outraged about?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, KHCast said:

Basically "get fucked and enjoy basic functions of this modern age" or "don't get fucked and have a tough time living in this age without it"

Most Americans have limited options when it comes to ISPs, making it hard to find a service that is perfectly suited to what you need (in more ways than just privacy policy.) Personally, living in a small town, I've always viewed shopping around for Internet to be a real "fuck you" experience, since there's no good option but I gotta have something.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The house is largely red, so the idea that it wasn't them who proposed reversing the FCC policies to Trump, which in turn opens a floodgate of shit that could possibly happen,(something the articles you quoted even say) even if not the intention is ridiculous.

Quote

House Republicans freed Internet service providers such as Verizon, AT&T and Comcast of protections approved just last year that had sought to limit what companies could do with information such as customer browsing habits, app usage history, location data and Social Security numbers. The rules also had required providers to strengthen safeguards for customer data against hackers and thieves.

The Senate has voted to nullify those measures, which were set to take effect at the end of this year. If Trump signs the legislation as expected, providers will be able to monitor their customers’ behavior online and, without their permission, use their personal and financial information to sell highly targeted ads — making them rivals to Google and Facebook in the $83 billion online advertising market.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

You must read and accept our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy to continue using this website. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.