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Sonic the Platformer


Badnik Zero
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The homing attack topic got me thinking that a move like that doesn't help platforming, especially when it's replaced with enemy chains. Some people like to say that Sonic is all about speed, something I saw reviewers saying about the series when I started reading all that a few years ago. The Genesis titles, Sonic Adventure, and Sonic Heroes to an extent weren't about to the wall adrenaline rush speed. Sonic used to jump on things, and not just enemies. I credit Unleashed with having the most actual platforms in a Sonic game for years. In fact some of the DLC levels are just a bunch of those platforms mapped together into a new level.

But it's a bit sorry that an alternate gameplay character like the Werehog does more jumping than Sonic himself, who started out as a platformer mascot.

Sonic used to push blocks around. You know that "pushing something" sprite? A game all about speed wouldn't ask you to slow down and push blocks back and forth. Platforming, people. We've lost the platforming. While Unleashed was good and even added wall kicks to the moveset, it's many parts a racing game. Sonic either needs to reinvent his own racer-platformer premise, or slow it down to manageable speeds.

"But Sawnik is the faster thing alive! Why should he slows down! That's stupid!" No it isn't.

In the end it's a game, and it needs to be playable. Racer-platformer is not a recognized genre, because Sonic hasn't done it right yet. His moveset isn't tailored to regular speeds, and trying to land him with precision has it's own learning curve in some games. I remember how Prince of Persia had a "walk carefully" button so you wouldn't get impaled by spikes. Sonic doesn't need toggled speeds, but it makes me appreciate the boost a bit more. This way Sonic's got an average top speed, and when you want to "juice" like Jaleel would've said, you hit that button. Now if there was a reasonable cap on that boost meter, or if the levels weren't built for time attacking, you might have something there.

If they named the next spin-off "Sonic Platformer" I would understand, because that's really not the norm for the series anymore. Anyone else think we need to slow down Sonic? Just strap some lead shoes on him so he can jump on things again?

Edited by Badnikz
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Absolutely.

The older Sonic games were great not because Sonic was fast, but because Sonic was fast in well-designed, fun, platforming levels that took advantage of his unique speed and moveset.

These days the focus is too much on speed, and not enough on good level design and enemy placement. Frankly, I don't care how fast Sonic is, as long as the game itself is well-designed, a component I feel has been missing for far too long. Thus, I don't think this is an issue of "fix Sonic" so much as "fix the stages Sonic interacts with", because right now, they're far too straightforward, and lack the great design they used to have.

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What I feel made classic Sonic special wasn't so much that he was fast so much that his speed made him into what I like to call a "sandbox character." What do I mean by that? Look at it this way: in Mario, your jumping only serves the basic platforming functions of boarding different platforms or killing enemies. When they wanted to make a different function, they created new enemies, new power ups, new environments to serve them. Even in Metroid or Zelda every move or item has about one or two basic functions and you have to get a new one every time you need to proceed.

But with Sonic, you only need one button and a control stick/pad and each stage gives you unique ways of utilizing them. The motivation comes from expecting a novel way of using the character with each stage rather than simply knowing there's an end of the level and if you do stuff good enough you'll reach it. In a sense, the environments are really more of a character than Sonic.

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I always thought that putting heavy platforming areas amongst speedy ramps and loops alongside some on-rails bits with an equal balance between running and jumping would fare well, rather than there being a monopoly of one over the other. Whilst I would have more fun with this idea, I'm not certain how others would like it. Fans seem to want one or the other. And on top of that, I don't see what's so wrong about adding platforming-style obstacles at high speeds. Unleashed seemed to integrate that well with the quick step, however it's more or less like dodging more so than jumping on platforms. Hmm.

I just don't think Sonic should be a simple platformer, but should become own genre. Certainly, platforming is a key essential, however there's no real label for spinning like a marble or grinding on rails in a game integrated with running through loops with air tricks and a simple spinning-based combat technique. No other platformer can be easily compared to Sonic anymore, he's become his own thing. Not even Mario can be compared alongside Sonic like back in the early 90s. Sonic's sort of... evolved.

But definitely, they need to re-establish more platforming in Sonic with a healthy balance. Having one become more important than the other would only annoy one side of the fanbase more than the other.

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Fuck yes, put a combi-ring on that hog's leg. Connect it to Heavy, and then we'll never have to deal with another Sonic Unleashed.

Sonic 1 is my favorite Sonic game; Sonic Adventure is my second favorite. What both of those games have in common are platforming, a good amount of speed, and exploration. Basically, everything I believe Sonic games should be (minus SA's glitches).

To sum it up, Sonic should NEVER be faster than his top speed in Sonic Adventure 2 (sans boost pads).

Edited by Legendary Emerald
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I would like to disagree with the above... Sonic can be as fast as he wants, its his acceleration that should be controllable, I mean when Sonic hits top speed he should be fast but in platformer section there will never be enough space to reach top speed and therefore he is still playable with the speed he has in a small section but is able to go really fast if there is a stretch.

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I would like to disagree with the above... Sonic can be as fast as he wants, its his acceleration that should be controllable, I mean when Sonic hits top speed he should be fast but in platformer section there will never be enough space to reach top speed and therefore he is still playable with the speed he has in a small section but is able to go really fast if there is a stretch.

This is what I find to be the problem. You had to specify "platformer section", whereas the original games were platformers in their entirety.

It brings up a good point, because recent games have a whole lot of running on straight paths of land, with the occasional enemy that you can effortlessly tap A twice to automatically jump into. I know I'm oversimplifying things with that description, but that has become the basic gist of things.

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Badnikz just won the entire forum over.

Sonic is a platformer with a top-speed somewhat faster than the average. The true way you get high speeds in a Sonic game is not by running, but by rolling and momentum, which is where Unleashed got it all wrong. E.G.G. pretty much nailed it, too; levels should be built around Sonic, not Sonic being built around levels. =P

I also believe that the compulsively-speedy levels of Unleashed were only made to suit to what kids want to see (which is also why I have a large problem with Sonic X). Media such as Sonic X has portrayed Sonic as a character that does nothing but run fast 24/7, which doesn't just make Sonic's personality rather shallow, but it also has made it to where all kids want to see Sonic do is run fast and nothing else. Hence Sega trying to be "cool" again and attracting kiddies with "HEY GUIZE LOOK AT THIS SONIC RUNS FAST LIKE OFF SONIC X". And while it's not that I'm saying Unleashed wasn't a good game (best one since '99 IMO), speed was over-emphasized in that game, so much that they HAD to seperate speed and platforming into two different gameplay catagories, and give Sonic his trusty "Sonic Boost" (naturally, I would like to see that concept die, I want my rolling / Spindash back =P).

..And maybe I'm getting a little off-topic. XD

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I'd support Sonic slowing down, to an extent. Unleashed was impressively fast, but at full speed it stopped being controlled running and became almost a blind QTE. It's probably best to step back from that sort of speed, keep it within the range where the average person can consistently react instead of just memorizing. Still, though, I don't think it's necessarily wrong for them to want Sonic to be as fast as possible; they just need to redefine it to "human reaction time" possible rather than "game engine" possible.

As far as platforming, yes, Sonic needs more of it. More importantly though, he needs more of it that takes advantage of his unique abilities. Just jumping from platform to platform is all well and good, but if that's the best they have to offer I might as well go play Mario. We need more bouncing, more rolling, more wall running, not just more things to jump on.

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Eh, it's tricky. Loads of people hate Unleashed and say it's too much running and too fast, but I didn't feel that way at all. It felt chock full of platforming to me. I really don't mind the "speed section > platforming section" alternating gameplay either.

I find it kind of hard to contribute to a discussion such as this because Unleashed literally was perfect to me... If they change the series to meet these standards of slow platforming, I admit I'd miss the thrill of Unleashed.

To clarify, it isn't even the automated "fast bits" that I love. It's doing the "slow bits" fast through practice which I really get a thrill out of. It's the first platformer I've ever played that really encourages that sort of speed-running/replaying/showing off factor. Sonic Adventure 2 did this too, but not to quite as much of an extent.

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But with Sonic, you only need one button and a control stick/pad and each stage gives you unique ways of utilizing them. The motivation comes from expecting a novel way of using the character with each stage rather than simply knowing there's an end of the level and if you do stuff good enough you'll reach it. In a sense, the environments are really more of a character than Sonic.

Nice! I agree with this statement 100 fold. It seems that the biggest problems with recent games is the simple fact that the levels just don't stand out anymore. SEGA and Sonic Team keep altering how Sonic moves/controls, but have completely forgotten about the levels. I forget where I heard this (may have been in a post or possible during one of the Sonic Hour shows) but a big problem with recent Sonic levels is that they're forgettable. Everybody remembers the older levels because they were unique. Take recent games though and it's a bit tougher to remember all the level names since they aren't really unique. Lets take Sonic Unleashed for example (btw I really enjoyed the game). Every level gimmick is simply a move by Sonic; boost, sidestep, stomp, etc. Each level employs these tactics, but its the same thing everytime. Each level is essentially the same, with just a unique coat of paint. Spagonia is probably the only unique level in Unleashed with its balloons and skydiving sequence. Essentially though, every day level in Sonic Unleashed employs the same exact tactics, but just looks differently. There were no true level gimmicks. On the other hand, if we look at Sonic Adventure, each level has its own "feel." The whale in Emerald coast, the Tornado sequence in Windy Valley, kart racing in Twinkle Park, and so forth (I use SA simply to show that this isn't a 3D problem, more of a modern day problem). For the most part, the older Sonic games were so memorable because, as was said, the levels were designed around Sonic. Now-a-days it seems like Sonic is thrown into a different games levels.

Should Sonic slow down? Maybe, but I think the larger issue is level design. The cool thing about the older level designs is that they showed off Sonic's abilities with being in your face about it. You didn't need all these button prompts and so forth.

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Yes to the whole topic.

If there was one thing that put me off about Unleashed was that it made too much of an emphasis on going as fast as possible, and the fact that Sonic, for the first time actually, went too fast for a proper game. While the game looks great (I've yet to play it D=) I would not want Sonic to have another game play like it without a few changes to the core gameplay, and the first thing to start with would be to slow him down.* But not exactly slow him down in the sense 'make his top speed lower than normal', but make his average top speed slower.

Take for example, Sonic Advance 2.

While most people bash the game for being a "hold right" fest, one thing that it got right on the money, was it's speed. On average, Sonic hardly ever went at full speed, and most of the time went half or 3/4th is top speed, case in point, the boss battles. This was because his acceleration didn't let him go at top speed immediately, and he usually started out at only moderate speed. And not to mention it had a smooth transition between normal speed and boost speed, and the whole mechanic relied on momentum to take full advantage of Sonic's speed. Normally, Sonic is only moderately fast, but in the right hands, his speed rivals that of Unleashed.

Frankly, I don't see why people haven't noticed it yet.

Sonic could move very fast, but it wasn't automatically given to him and it mostly relied on gaining speed through momentum, took full advantage of the physics, and allowed the player to easily move slowly at will. The only problem with that game was that the level design didn't take complete advantage of the mechanics, or had bad level design in general.

Take Unleashed's moveset, and mix it with Advance 2's mechanics, and it = Perfect Sonic gameplay, IMO. All it'd need is good level design that takes advantage of both.

But as for level design, there's a bit of a line that should be drawn between how the game transitions between speed and platforming sections. One thing that would kill the flow is if Sonic is forced to come to a complete stop after running at mach 10 to do a platforming section. The game should ease the player into a slower section of the level, and not be interrupted in the middle of a speed section. It should feel like it ends at a certain point, like running up a ramp to a higher ledge, or hitting a spring over across an area, all of which, force Sonic to slow down, but feels smooth and part of the level. That way, the player is fully aware that the level design is slowing down, and he/she doesn't feel interrupted after running so fast, and brings the players attention to a part of the level that would require slower movement.

And as for balance, speed sections should mainly exist as a way of moving from one area to another, sort of like a transition between areas of the level. If anything, these should be the sections where the player can just hold right/up and just enjoy the ride. Platforming should be the singular main focus of most levels, but be open and more spacious for the player to still be able to run around in, and still move quickly.

So as for the main topic question, should Sonic slow down? I think no, he shouldn't slow down. He should be able to go very fast, but he shouldn't always go that fast, or even fast at all on regular basis. The level design shouldn't enable Sonic to go as fast as possible, ala Unleashed, hence why Sonic should be built around levels, and not vice versa.

*I forgot about the DLC stages, which looked very well done and gave Sonic the platforming edge that the main stages mostly lacked. Makes me wonder why stages like that weren't included in the main game?**

**Keep in mind I haven't play Unleashed at all yet.

Edited by VirgoTheCougar
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Eh, it's tricky. Loads of people hate Unleashed and say it's too much running and too fast, but I didn't feel that way at all. It felt chock full of platforming to me. I really don't mind the "speed section > platforming section" alternating gameplay either.

This is how I feel. It might have been a little bit better to have more hardcore platforming sections, but I think it did relatively well already with it. I'd rather just tweak the balance between the speed and platforming sections they had in Unleashed rather than completely abandon the way things were set up in favor of something else.

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I also believe that the compulsively-speedy levels of Unleashed were only made to suit to what kids want to see (which is also why I have a large problem with Sonic X).

Actually, the kids responded very well to werehog Sonic, liking the much slower pace in gameplay. It's the older crowd who need Sonic to be fast since it was his signature in a 2D era.

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I don't think anyone's going to disagree with the addition of platforming. Sonic is a platformer, and platforming is fun. However, I've always cringed at the thought of slowing him down. I look at things like Sonic X, Unleashed's intro, and even the CD intro and outro and always wonder how awesome it would be if Sonic was actually controllable like that. I don't like to think of Sonic as a pinball who is only worth his mojo if he can find some decent inclines. What I ultimately want is a fully-controllable beast with all of his super powers intact, speed included, to the point where he is capable of manually performing the impossible acrobatics that make the aforementioned videos so exciting to watch.

Seriously, if I want to run across the street, rebound off of a car, land against a building, start running up that building, jump off, boost through the air across a city block, and change my trajectory in mid-air so I can aim for and boost towards the ground, all in a bid to get to the shop so I can buy a new chili dog, then I should be allowed to do so; Let me break out of those pinball physics and linear rails when I want to. Once they've given me that kind of hedgehog, I want them to say, "Here's a level, now go out and conquer, and look good while doing it." So in a way, I would rather them build the levels around what Sonic can do because with how such a character can really move, I reckon that entire levels could be just as much about platforming as they could be about speed, and your experience with either element would just be dependent upon your preference for maneuvering through a level.

At least, that's what I can dream about. I know shit about game design, how any of that would be applicable to real life, or how well it would work in the context of a Sonic game, but it doesn't stop me from imagining and subsequently gravitating towards experiences like Unleashed nowadays than S3&K, both of which I love dearly. Unleashed is a really thrilling way to play Sonic, QTEs and lacking platforming and all, what with Sonic's expanded moveset and the speed he's blessed with. The daytime levels felt like only a taste of what could ultimately be, but nevertheless I've felt for years that Sonic could be so much more than what he is or even has been before, regardless of whether or not he abandons the gameplay mechanics that made him great in his heyday in the process.

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I think a bit of both is needed, but certainly the level design itself needs to be sorted. I want loops and fancy things to give speed illusion, (blasting over water in Unleashed made me VERY happy) but I also want the option to slow down and explore enviroments in some cases, and it's not difficult to make it obvious where you CAN do this. You just need enemies and items that require more time to destroy. The player will soon learn to look out for those. I want more of what SA2 provided, with a camera that works and a Sonic who is easier to control. I would say I want more grinding, but fuck, they've just ruined grinding by putting it pointlessly everywhere.

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I don't think anyone's going to disagree with the addition of platforming. Sonic is a platformer, and platforming is fun. However, I've always cringed at the thought of slowing him down. I look at things like Sonic X, Unleashed's intro, and even the CD intro and outro and always wonder how awesome it would be if Sonic was actually controllable like that. I don't like to think of Sonic as a pinball who is only worth his mojo if he can find some decent inclines. What I ultimately want is a fully-controllable beast with all of his super powers intact, speed included, to the point where he is capable of manually performing the impossible acrobatics that make the aforementioned videos so exciting to watch.

Seriously, if I want to run across the street, rebound off of a car, land against a building, start running up that building, jump off, boost through the air across a city block, and change my trajectory in mid-air so I can aim for and boost towards the ground, all in a bid to get to the shop so I can buy a new chili dog, then I should be allowed to do so; Let me break out of those pinball physics and linear rails when I want to. Once they've given me that kind of hedgehog, I want them to say, "Here's a level, now go out and conquer, and look good while doing it." So in a way, I would rather them build the levels around what Sonic can do because with how such a character can really move, I reckon that entire levels could be just as much about platforming as they could be about speed, and your experience with either element would just be dependent upon your preference for maneuvering through a level.

At least, that's what I can dream about. I know shit about game design, how any of that would be applicable to real life, or how well it would work in the context of a Sonic game, but it doesn't stop me from imagining and subsequently gravitating towards experiences like Unleashed nowadays than S3&K, both of which I love dearly. Unleashed is a really thrilling way to play Sonic, QTEs and lacking platforming and all, what with Sonic's expanded moveset and the speed he's blessed with. The daytime levels felt like only a taste of what could ultimately be, but nevertheless I've felt for years that Sonic could be so much more than what he is or even has been before, regardless of whether or not he abandons the gameplay mechanics that made him great in his heyday in the process.

Couldn't agree more with this.

I still feel that severly gimping Sonic's speed would be a mistake. Does he have to be as fast as he is in Unleashed? Not exactly (wouldn't hurt though). Make it so that he's never allowed to go beyond his pain-staking Sonic Adventure 2 speed for the rest of his existence? Hell no. I don't mind slowing down every now and than for platforming, block pushing, and whatever. But like Nepenthe, I want to feel like I'm actually a high speed hero not just a guy who jogs a little quick.

I much rather have them work on the level design instead of crushing Sonic's main trait. I enjoyed Unleashed (on the PS3 at least) for it's stylish speed, and quality programming, but I definitely felt the levels themselves could have used some work. Much like the Sonic Rush games, what they did was great. The problem was they didn't do much besides that. It definitely had a hand over Rush with the additional moves like Wall Kicking and more unique platforms like the spinning gears in Chun-Nan...but that was it. And due to such limited design, the levels were short. Thus forcing Werehog to fill space.

Personally, I think it's time they went to making open-ended worlds. Instead of just running in a straight path like Unleashed, take that speed and place it in a wide open space. No pits or tons of walls (invisible or otherwise) to keep in a hallway. You can run around the entire area and look amazing while doing it like in Unleashed all you want, and to progress the game you do missions. And I'm not talking about that "Collect the Rings" garbage from Unleashed Wii, but actual missions. Which will, at times, require Sonic to do stuff at slower speeds such as pushing blocks like the OP mentions.

That way, they can keep the thrilling speed, design more platform task, allow plenty of freedom, AND make the game long enough without adding annoying filler.

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The classics and Sa1 would be good or the best examples of properly combing speed and platforming. I prefer platforming and speed go hand in hand so it could be balanced. Going at fast speeds yet still be able to control it so Sonic can maneuver around obstacles, slow down to jump from one place to another, and whatnot while still have the power to accelerate quickly when needed.

Sonic games need a balance of both speed and platforming along with well executed gameplay to keep it and flow steadily altogether.

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Okay, maybe I underestimated Sonic's top speed (on foot). Sure, Sonic is supposed to be pretty fast (think SA1 speed), but I don't think it should be Unleashed speed. Like said, though, I don't think that true insane speed should be granted to you via running, taking advantage of physics by rolling should be under control of that.

So, I don't think the point was to remove most of his speed; I believe the point was to limit it a bit (drop his Unleashed speed to SA1 speed) and really I believe rolling should be left to the rest of the story. Because really, the main reason I believe Unleashed was so forced-forward was because of the said Boost. Boosting was WAY too overpowering, and removed the challenge to reach near-impossible speeds. The Genesis games took speed as a reward for mastering the skills of taking advantage over the equation "speed + momentum = more speed". Unleashed was a spamfest, and since so much of the level consisted of either doing a QTE (another not-so-good idea) or holding said X Button, it ended up being nothing but a "move forward" game.

SA1 gave me what I wanted out of a Sonic game: nice handling (both in air and on ground), momentum-based physics (although still rather wonky), a Spindash and rolling. It worked well for good platforming, exploration, and speed, which is certainly what is needed. And while it had it's flaws (spammable Spindash, physics was messy in places, camera was atrocious), I excused it (being Sega's first 3D attempt) and really wanted Sega to just take what they had and evolve off of it. Sadly, they seemingly never did (not SA2 or Nextgen, those were devolutions =P).

Why they can't just attempt to do what they did again and do it right is beyond me.

Edited by Azukara
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The Genesis games took speed as a reward for mastering the skills of taking advantage over the equation "speed + momentum".
I'm starting to think that people are massively overestimating this supposed challenge of gaining speed in the Genesis games. I mean, "press down on hills" isn't exactly a complex formula.

I find that keeping the speed is far more important/challenging/exciting than just getting it. And that part can still be done with boosting; no matter which style you're using, if you hit an enemy, trap, or wall, you stop. Having something like the boost just means you can get right back into the fun part of trying not to crash instead of having to wait for a dash pad or a hill or something to really get moving.

And thinking about it, doesn't the momentum style discourage stopping and exploring too? I mean, stopping in itself penalizes you by removing your speed. And when you can't easily get that speed back, that's a pretty sizable penalty for the possibility (not even the guarantee) of some little cache.

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All I want is to feel fast because I am fast again. Thing is, I like speed sections, but not when they feel like the focus of the entire level. Nor when it feels as though you're being funneled through the level.

This is what I liked about Sonic '06, it split itself into sections rather than forcing the entire level to be long and thin to deal with possible transition problems.

The thing I like more about previous games (both 2D and 3D) is that I felt like I was fast because I was the one in control.

For me, Unleashed felt more like I was just watching Sonic be fast. I had this same problem with the new Prince of Persia, where it felt as though I was being lead into everything rather than doing it myself because of the 'flow', or snap-to-grid gameplay.

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I think Unleashed got it right with regards to exploring too... it just blocked off too many places.

Unleashed has TONS of little areas off the beaten track containing goodies, the problem is, most of these are inconspicious because 90% of seemingly alternate paths are barred with invisible walls. The 10% that don't however, are quite rewarding to find (such as the one moon medal hidden away in the only cute little caf

Edited by JezMM
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I'm starting to think that people are massively overestimating this supposed challenge of gaining speed in the Genesis games. I mean, "press down on hills" isn't exactly a complex formula.

I find that keeping the speed is far more important/challenging/exciting than just getting it. And that part can still be done with boosting; no matter which style you're using, if you hit an enemy, trap, or wall, you stop. Having something like the boost just means you can get right back into the fun part of trying not to crash instead of having to wait for a dash pad or a hill or something to really get moving.

And thinking about it, doesn't the momentum style discourage stopping and exploring too? I mean, stopping in itself penalizes you by removing your speed. And when you can't easily get that speed back, that's a pretty sizable penalty for the possibility (not even the guarantee) of some little cache.

I was counting the "keeping speed" thing as part of the challenge. But yes, I know it's not hard to understand what rolling down a hill does. =P

Plus, it's simple as this: Speed discourages stopping and exploring. But it can be compromised (like how the Genesis games did) by making exploration available through using the said momentum, and the places you explore grant you this as well. Plus, rolling isn't an automatic speed-boost like the Sonic Boost is, and since it doesn't, you fully have the choice to go fast or not. The point is that the momentum gameplay engulfs you to want to explore for these alternate routes.

And yes, JezMM, Unleashed would have been MUCH better if it wasn't so limited to a thin, linear playfield.

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I'm starting to think that people are massively overestimating this supposed challenge of gaining speed in the Genesis games. I mean, "press down on hills" isn't exactly a complex formula.

I find that keeping the speed is far more important/challenging/exciting than just getting it. And that part can still be done with boosting; no matter which style you're using, if you hit an enemy, trap, or wall, you stop. Having something like the boost just means you can get right back into the fun part of trying not to crash instead of having to wait for a dash pad or a hill or something to really get moving.

And thinking about it, doesn't the momentum style discourage stopping and exploring too? I mean, stopping in itself penalizes you by removing your speed. And when you can't easily get that speed back, that's a pretty sizable penalty for the possibility (not even the guarantee) of some little cache.

Hmmm, thats a good point. I really like how you said "keeping" the speed. A beautiful moment in a Sonic game is when you can truly get through a level without stopping (using skill). More recent Sonic games seems to either force you to stop to do certain things (in other words there is no way to get around having to slow down) or the game gives you no reason to slow down (linear boost fests lol). I like the concept of a "boost". As a speed character, a boost can really help Sonic out since it provides an instant means to get away from something. Unleashed abused the boost, turning into a common necessity instead of a strategic element. I don't think it should be done away with, just reworked. I want the boost to be one of those things where you feel accomplished when you use it.

Looking back at the older Sonic games, you never really had to completely stop unless you chose to. Also, the levels kind-of helped with the illusion of speed (ie running away from flowing lava, dodgin enemy attacks, chasing after a boss, avoiding falling platforms, etc. Elements were incorporated into each level which made Sonic appear even faster than he ran. In more recent games, the only reason why we go through the levels as fast as we can is because A) Sonic is fast and therefor goes fast and 2) because we get ranked. In the older games you went through a level fast (even platforming elements) because you had to. If you slowed down you would miss platforms and have to wait for them respawn or get hit by an enemyt or worse, die.

EDIT: Azukara, you make a good point, but speed only discourages Stopping, it doesn't discourage exploring. If anything, it ENCOURAGES exploring since, as a fast character, Sonic can transverse large pieces of land, exploring more of it. Also, the boost is optional, so it doesn't force you to go fast. It's the design of the levels which discourage exploring as well as the appearance that the boost was mandatory.

Edited by Chaos Skies
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