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Which characters could wield Thor's Hammer

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Which characters do you see would be be worthy of wielding Thor Odinsons hammer from Marvel Comics. Personally Only Shadow and Blaze, hes got a warriors heart and does not hesitate to kill his foes to protect people from evil and Blaze because as despite her royak luneage shes devoted to peace and prosperity and is humble about her great powers with a also a warriors resolve and responsibility as a princess.

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I always questioned how Mjolnir works. There are way way too many saints in Marvel universe and frankly Thor isn't one of them.

Obvious answer is that every writers takes it into different direction, BUT when I'm confused I just go back to the source, in this case early comics and Thor movie. I feel like "being worthy" must have more nuances that being good or just believing that you're worthy. That's still needed, but there is a more than that.

My best guess is that there are several points but the KEY part of "being worthy" is duality of warrior and man of peace. The wisdom when to use hammer and knowing when to use words. What makes Thor different from most "saint" is that he's warrior at heart, something that Odin and viking world would find a good trait. BUT Thor is cast on Earth (both in comic and movie) for being too prideful and destructive in using his hammer. And seeing that Thor is not just hero, but future king, he must know when to NOT fight.
(I'm not being fan of Captain America holding the hammer, but I suppose he's pretty close to fitting this description).

So which of the Sonic heroes could lift the hammer?
Maybe Sonic (because he's the titular character), but I doubt it. He's a hero, but not a warrior.
Similar problem for Tails, Silver, etc,.

Shadow and Knuckles and  have opposite problem, they too much like young Thor. The whole point of this safe fail is to stop aggressive types from wrecking everything with it. They lack restrain.

So honestly my only candidates are Amy (ironic I know) and possibly Blaze.

Amt wasn't born with hammer, she picked it up because she wanted to fight. She has a deep anger, passion for fight (look at her boxercising in Battle).
But as both Adventure games show she knows when to talk instead of smash. If she gained god-like power, she would know when to hold back.
You could make argument that Amy isn't enough of a warrior, but if Jane Foster wielded hammer, I think Amy can too.

Blaze miiiight have similar traits, but I'm not certain. She already posses a great power that she needs to control, plus is a royalty. But I have no proof she knows when to choose road of peace. In Rush 1 she got into fight for no reason.... which to be fair is something Thor does too.

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To me, the belief of worthiness is the end all be all when it comes to Mjolnir. The unshakable, undeniable, unflinching understanding that one is so dedicated to his core ideals that he embodies the qualities that garnish designation, respect and leadership. Worthiness is not exclusive to good guys or bad guys, but instead the culmination of a characters commitment and how invested said character is in following the path necessary to making those truths the reality. Not for personal gain, but for the collective benefit. Its worth noting that when Thor lost the ability to wield his hammer, it was distinctly labeled as being due to the fact that he himself at the time did not deem himself worthy of it. Not some mythical condemnation of something he had done, but a personal doubt in his brand and what he stood for. Belief is the key.

Thor is obviously the first guy people think of when it comes to Mjolnir, and rightfully so, but in discussions like this I think its more appropriate to look over at Captain America. As a mortal man, he is forced to wear the qualities that make him worthy on his sleeve, which makes for a more easy approach for a dissection of his attributes. Above all Cap is a beacon of hope to a planet of superheroes. He's a human rally point. The first man heroes and civilians alike look to when in need of guidance.  He's justice incarnate, the voice in the room for any and all of the oppressed. He's earned that status by being a paragon of virtue from the day he set foot on the hero scene. He stands up for everyone and is unmovable in his dedication to what he believes in.  Even when its unpopular and his own country turns its back on him, Cap sticks to his ideals knowing they will eventually see him through. Cap embodies self sacrifice. He leads by example and does it all no matter the odds against him.

Then there is the other side of Cap. His recent run as a Hydra agent showed that despite being evil and responsible for the deaths of millions, so long as those same traits remained intact, he could still wield the mighty hammer. Yes he was a bad guy, but he had seen the future - and despite knowing it would lead to his death at the hands of Miles Morales, Hydra Cap tied up his bootstraps and continued the fight, because at the end of the day, all that mattered was that Hydra won, not his own survival. It was his sole belief that he was fighting for a virtue that was bigger than himself. That's the same tenacity and mission first orientation that made him worthy as a hero. Those same qualities maintained his status as worthy, even when you would imagine it shouldn't.

 

All that considered, I think there are only 2 characters in the Sonic Franchise who can match up to all that. One that falls just short of worthiness, and may be able to get there with a bit more maturity, and then another one who could probably walk into a Marvel Crossover tomorrow and use Mjolnir to aggressively redecorate some poor villains personal space.

First up....

 

 

SONIC

He's the obvious choice right? Far and away he's the closest thing this franchise has to Captain America. Without question, the Blue Blur is the beacon of hope for pretty much everyone not named Eggman. Civilians and heroes alike look up to Sonic and follow his example. Like Cap, Sonic is a One-Hog rally flag, restoring the will to fight on where it had once evaporated. Like Cap, fellow heroes temper their own decisions by trying to live up to the example Sonic set before them. Like Cap, Sonic is tireless in his pursuit of his ideals and will not yield, no matter how powerful or insurmountable the force set against him presents itself to be. Sonic has all the leadership and virtue intangibles locked up.

... but I don't think he's worthy to lift that hammer. At least not yet anyway.

 

I think there are two main factors that would prevent his worthy status. The first is the need to constantly stroke his cool persona. While most of it is harmless to the worthiness discussion, overall it does show that Sonic puts some significant degree of weight on what the people around him think of him. Sonic keeps up appearances, and will alter his behavior if it means showing weakness, vulnerability or anything that might make him come off as not cool. That seed of doubt, that hesitance to act without first consulting how it will impact what the world thinks of him ultimately undermines his chance at being worthy. In the end, Sonic would likely act in the manner which he believes is right, which is admirable, however the idea that he would even consider running an action on a spot-check through his ego first shows that his priorities are often backwards.

If push comes to shove, Sonic will put on his empathy cap, but more often then not its either when he is pushed/forced to do so, or done in a small enough setting to where there isn't a crowd to make a spectacle of the issue.

Which brings me to the second thing holding Sonic back. His priorities. I don't think anyone here would question Sonic's virtues. He's always there to stand against the unjust for the little guy. Always willing to fight impossible odds to save the day. However that's also something Sonic does for selfish reasons. As many times as Sonic's biographies state that he is the defender of what he believes is right, it also categorizes him as a thrill-seeker. It paints him in a more selfish light, where half the reason Sonic goes on these adventures is for the pure adrenaline rush of living on the edge. There is nothing wrong with enjoying the exciting parts of the hero job description, but it is so ingrained into his character that you could label Sonic as more of a selfish character even while he's doing selfless things.

If Sonic ever grows out of his thrill-seeker persona and develops a worldview that puts his heart fully ahead of his ego, I think he'd be able to get that Hammer off the ground.

 

As for the other character, the one I believe whom is worthy today, well, the rest of you seem to have hit this nail on the head already.

 

Blaze

After overcoming the blind rage and loneliness that defined her character in the first Rush, Blaze has developed into A passionate, strong and direct to the point kind of hero. Her status as nobility not only places her in a position of power but also puts her headfirst into a situation that demands a deft hand at leadership. Her position as guardian imbues her with ridiculous responsibility. After first believing it to be a curse, Blaze's views of her own flames have become that of a gift, to be used in helping her defend her world against the evils that constantly assail it.

Blaze harbors many of the same virtues as Sonic. Other characters look up to her for guidance. Blaze will stare down impossible odds if it means keeping everyone else safe. Where Blaze sets herself apart from Sonic is her ability to act on her convictions without fear or reprisal. Where Sonic fell short in reprimanding Marine, Blaze stepped up and did what needed to be done. It didn't matter to her that such an action would assuredly hurt the little girls feelings, it was a course of action that needed to be taken for the good of the mission. Where Sonic often does things for the thrill factor, and finds his goals aligning with the greater good as a result, Blaze starts with the intention of making the world a better place and follows through. Whereas Sonic can often be a hero of coincidence, Blaze is one by choice. That's huge when it comes to worthiness.

 

 

So that's my take. If you twist my arm, I could probably see a character like Omega also being in this discussion.

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20 hours ago, Sega DogTagz said:

To me, the belief of worthiness is the end all be all when it comes to Mjolnir.

Interesting but 3 problems with this idea

1) I don't see how Thor would would have higher self-stem than any other Marvel character.

2) What about people who raised Mjolnir without knowing how it works, like Beta Ray Bill? How could he believe in his worthiness if he did not know of the test?

3) Dr Doom can't raise the hammer, despite possessing will of iron and blind belief he's worthy of being king of universe, because everyone else sucks?

BTW If we ignore vague canon  (what if, crossover, other timelines) and loopholes (like Thunderstrike being merged with Thor or Magneto or robots) there are 4 people who raised the hammer
- Thor
- Jane Foster
- Beta Ray Bill
- Captain America

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On 3/2/2021 at 4:58 PM, Sega DogTagz said:

Then there is the other side of Cap. His recent run as a Hydra agent showed that despite being evil and responsible for the deaths of millions, so long as those same traits remained intact, he could still wield the mighty hammer. Yes he was a bad guy, but he had seen the future - and despite knowing it would lead to his death at the hands of Miles Morales, Hydra Cap tied up his bootstraps and continued the fight, because at the end of the day, all that mattered was that Hydra won, not his own survival. It was his sole belief that he was fighting for a virtue that was bigger than himself. That's the same tenacity and mission first orientation that made him worthy as a hero. Those same qualities maintained his status as worthy, even when you would imagine it shouldn't.

I haven't really read Marvel Comics and am not knowledgeable about their lore, but according to a video I watched recently (Linkara's review of Secret Origin), it actually was established in a later comic that he wasn't actually worthy and somehow the magic of the hammer had been rewritten to be based on strength rather than worthiness, which is how he could lift it. Even as a non-Marvel fan it sounds somewhat silly, but yeah.

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6 hours ago, MetalSkulkBane said:

1) I don't see how Thor would would have higher self-stem than any other Marvel character.

Its not just tied to his self-esteem, its a culmination of factors. True belief comes not only in complete faith in ones own ability to be worth of lifting Mjolnir, but the understanding that everyone around you also believes the same.  In both the comics and the movies, it was as important that the denizens of the 9 realms also viewed Thor as a worthy king, on top of regaining his own confidence. When either or both of those core pillars is shook, poof, can't lift the hammer.

 

6 hours ago, MetalSkulkBane said:

2) What about people who raised Mjolnir without knowing how it works, like Beta Ray Bill? How could he believe in his worthiness if he did not know of the test?

 

If Captain America didn't know the words of the enchantment, it wouldn't change his worthiness and he would still be able to pick up the hammer. The qualities that determine his worthiness stem from his dedication, tenacity and leadership. Qualities that remain unchanged regardless of what he knew of the hammer or not. Beta Ray is no doubt the same. The hammer would resonate with him because the qualities that make him worthy are well apparent and would be recognized by his peers (if they could see his past anyway). Faith in those qualities is no different than faith in being worthy.

The hammer is capable of insight of that degree, as Jane Foster proved when she lifted the hammer. Her biggest call to worthiness was choosing the wield the hammer to help people - rather than abuse it - which was something that technically haven't happened yet and could not have been realized by her peers right away. Yet she was able to lift the hammer, because she possessed those qualities and that intent that later became clear through her actions. Another good example is Vision in the MCU. Despite half the Avengers believing him to be a threat, Vision was able to hand Thor his hammer. Even though no one in the room could have predicted his worthiness, had they known the characteristics he possessed that made him worthy, they would not of questioned it. The hammer is capable of seeing past both ignorance and unfamiliarity.

Bill benefits from the same pass to ignorance and unfamiliarity. Despite not knowing the enchantment, and no one else knowing who he was at first, the hammer yielded to the the qualities that Bill possessed that made him worthy. Qualities the hammer could recognize and others would see as they got to know him. Bill's tenacity and determination were always there. Even if no one was around to ask him if he felt he was worthy, his faith in his own qualities, to the degree that they would be unchallenged by those around him once they got to know him, was no different than feeling that he himself was worthy. Kinda like doing the math in reverse.

 

6 hours ago, MetalSkulkBane said:

3) Dr Doom can't raise the hammer, despite possessing will of iron and blind belief he's worthy of being king of universe, because everyone else sucks?

Dr Doom has a noted inferiority complex, which would automatically strike his name from the list of the worthy. How can he be with that smug Reed Richards sitting right there lol. At the same time, his superiority complex to ever other person on the planet means he is often incapable of considering the opinions and thoughts of others. Quite frankly, by belittling everyone else to such a degree, he is incapable of seeing them as seeing himself as worthy - because for the most part, their opinions do not matter. To Doom, he is the only one with the vision and knowledge to get the job done, less so because he is worthy and more so because everyone else is trash.

There are a ton of villains that can lay claim to an utterly iron constitution and a total commitment to their intended cause - but most fall short of worthy status because of stuff like this. Jack Kirby once described Doom as a perfectionist that could not accept his own imperfections. That seed of doubt is all it takes. For well rounded villains, there is always that seed that gets in the way of being worthy.

 

 

3 minutes ago, Monkey Destruction Switch said:

I haven't really read Marvel Comics and am not knowledgeable about their lore, but according to a video I watched recently (Linkara's review of Secret Origin), it actually was established in a later comic that he wasn't actually worthy and somehow the magic of the hammer had been rewritten to be based on strength rather than worthiness, which is how he could lift it. Even as a non-Marvel fan it sounds somewhat silly, but yeah.

 

Due to the mumbo-jumbo-magics of the Cosmic Cube a lot of strange -ish went down that was never fully explained, Madam Hydra may have been able to manipulate the inscription, but there is still some wiggle room in there. For starters, even if the inscription was changed to recognize the strongest instead of the worthy... that still wouldn't apply to Hydra Cap at that point in time. Yet, up the hammer went.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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